Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Ask any displaced Texan what they miss from home and they'll likely list a few items: brisket, football, higher speed limits, tacos and kolaches.

Now, if you're lucky enough to have had a kolache, you know it's a Texas staple, but if you haven't had one, you're probably still trying to figure out how to pronounce the word. It's "ko-lah-chee."

Music writer Fran Hoepfner (@franhoepfner) speaks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about her love for “Symphony from the New World” by Antonin Dvorak.

Dvorak, who was Czech, wrote it in 1893 while in the U.S. leading a conservatory and studying American folk music. It’s become a famous musing on what “home” means, and what “American-ness” sounds like.

You know it from the first few notes of Thurl Ravenscroft's barrel-chested performance — singing "You're a Mean One, Mr. Grinch" with the same flair he brought to playing Tony the Tiger in Kellogg's cereal commercials — Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas is a holiday classic.

The animated film turns 50 this year, airing on NBC about three weeks before its actual birthday. And it is, admittedly, a little weird to call a 26-minute cartoon about a green guy who learns not to steal Christmas presents an enduring masterpiece.

UMG

With a whistle and a guitar, Ennio Morricone changed film and music history. Sergio Leone, a director with only one feature to his credit and a couple of gigs polishing up other pictures, called upon the composer to score his new-fangled Western, “A Fistful of Dollars,” loosely based on the Akira Kurosawa film “Yojimbo,” which itself was based on an American noir by Dashiell Hammett.

SAMA

If the idea of expressing thankfulness for what you have by heading to the mall to buy more on Black Friday rubs you the wrong way, you're not alone. Why not do something enriching instead?

"We have an alternative here with our exhibits," says Sarah Gould.

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