Border & Immigration

Lorne Matalon

This week on Fronteras: 

  •  Increasing danger for journalists covering organized crime across the border in Mexico.
  •  Environmentalists file against the U.S. government claiming President Trump’s border wall will harm endangered species.
  •   Are confederate monuments a symbol of racism?
  •  Performer and social activist Irma Herrera makes the case for respecting the pronunciation of a person’s name.
  •  For refugee students, getting through school can be tough.  That’s why a Dallas couple says they’re helping kids in their neighborhood.

 

Al Ortiz

  

This week on Fronteras:  

 

 

  •  Harris County votes to stay out of the SB4 lawsuit despite vocal citizen protests.
  •  An Iraqi national who came here for a better life and helped the U.S. military during the war faces deportation in New Mexico.
  •   An exhibit in San Diego highlights items precious to refugees who fled their war torn nations.
  •  San Antonians get a new look at a huge rediscovered mosaic by a Mexican artist that had not been in plain sight until recently.

 

DANIEL SALINAS / LAS CRUCES HIGH SCHOOL

This week on Fronteras: 

  • Residents along the U.S.-Mexico border have water that is not fit for drinking or even washing clothes.
  •   Many pregnant rural New Mexicans live more than 60 miles away from a safe place to deliver their babies.
  •   In Austin, U-T students play a vital role in helping refugee children make their transition to America.
  • The state of Texas wants to move the sanctuary cities lawsuit from San Antonio federal court to Austin.
  • Experiencing the art of Mexican fine dining.  It’s a pricey new trend

Joey Palacios / TPR

  

This week on Fronteras:

  •  SB4, the state’s new sanctuary cities law, has its day in court.
  • The Trump Administration’s curbs on immigration prompt Mexico to implement programs to help its unauthorized residents living in America.
  •  Legislation is pending to help deported veterans who put their lives on the line fighting for the U.S.
  •  A lawsuit in New Mexico aims to ensure all children of color get a leg up on learning.
  • In Houston, the largest exhibit of modern Mexican art to be seen in the U.S. in 70 decades is on display.
  • An update on the Arbol de la Vida art project that tells community stories about Mission San Francisco de la Espada.

 

From Texas Standard:

Senate Bill 4, known as the “show me your papers” law to its opponents, currently faces a challenge in a San Antonio federal court. If the law takes effect, police in Texas will be able to ask people they stop about their immigration status.

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