Border & Immigration

The White House

HOUSTON — The U.S. government says it “erroneously” awarded three-year work permits to 2,000 people under President Barack Obama's executive immigration action after a judge had put the plan on hold.

The revelation is the second time the federal government has had to clarify whether part of the immigration plan had been implemented after a court order that put it on hold.

In a court document filed Thursday, the Justice Department said that U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services discovered that about 2,000 individuals had been mistakenly sent three-year work authorizations after U.S. District Judge Andrew Hanen in Brownsville, Texas, issued a preliminary injunction on Feb. 16 that temporarily blocked the immigration action.

Immigration: Where Do The Presidential Hopefuls Stand?

May 7, 2015
ACLU of Texas

WASHINGTON — Immigration, a prominent issue as the presidential campaign begins in earnest, is a complicated, emotional and broad subject. But for political purposes there’s a very real question to be answered: What to do about the estimated 11 million people in the country illegally.

President Barack Obama says his executive actions blocking the deportation of millions living illegally in the U.S. go as far as the law allows. But Hillary Rodham Clinton says that if she becomes president, she would go even further.

Joy Diaz / KUT Public Radio

This week on Fronteras:

--A half-million people on the Texas-Mexico border live in colonias which often lack running water, electricity and basic services.  The Obama Administration wants border states to spend more money to improve life in these communities.

--The Cardinal considered to be Pope Francis’ most reliable advisor blames Mexican drugs lords for the surge of Central American children crossing the border into the United States.

--Attorneys get courtroom training on how to win asylum for detained immigrant mothers and children.

Rio Grande Valley Adds To Border Horse Patrol

Apr 30, 2015
Courtesy: U.S. Customs And Border Protection

MISSION, Texas — Jared Barton has ridden horses since he was a toddler.

But rumbling on a Florida cattle ranch isn’t the same as the trails he’ll traverse going forward — the rough terrain of immigrant and drug smuggling trails in the Rio Grande Valley.

The Monitor reports Barton is one of the latest members of the U.S. Border Horse Patrol, a specialty group of agents that work on horseback and have been doing so since the early 1920s.

The 38-year-old agent was one of seven agents who officially completed a six-week training course to join the group in the Rio Grande Valley sector.

As NPR and other news outlets report about the hundreds of people killed this month when the ship they were on went down off the Libyan coast, the stories are referring to those who died as "migrants."

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