Border & Immigration

Border & Immigration
4:31 am
Tue June 3, 2014

Texas Air Base Houses Minors Crossing Solo Into U.S.

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 4:49 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. The number of children crossing the U.S. border on their own is soaring. Just since October, the U.S. found some 80,000 unaccompanied minors crossing over from Mexico. Those are just the kids who were caught.

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Fronteras
1:53 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

Will This Planned West Texas Clean Coal Project Be A Game Changer?

Construction on a coal-fired power plant equipped with carbon capture and storage technology (CCS) is expected to begin here in Penwell, Texas this year. One of two such plants in the U.S., the other is in Kemper, Mississippi.
Jason Lewis U.S. Department of Energy

Fronteras: The Democrat facing newly-nominated Republican Dan Patrick in the Texas lieutenant governor race says Sen. Patrick’s pledge to campaign in the minority community is “insulting.” New EPA rules to cut carbon emissions are expected to be unveiled soon. The new rules are expected to spur the use of a so-called clean coal technology. There are fewer than 100 fluent speakers of Kumeyaay left in Southern California and northern Baja California, where they once dominated. Efforts are now underway to preserve the endangered language.

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Border & Immigration
9:53 am
Tue May 27, 2014

"Inhumane" Conditions Reported At Temporary Immigrant Holding Facility In McAllen

Credit U.S. Border Patrol

Overcrowding and disease at a temporary immigration detention center in McAllen has the U.S. Border Patrol themselves calling on congress for humanitarian aid. 

Because of the McAllen facility's temporary status, capacity is about 300. But this past week Border Patrol agents brought in 1,000 immigrants and the situation has Chris Cabrera with the local Border Patrol agent's union calling on Congress for help.

"It’s a humanitarian-type deal as far as seeing these people going through what they’re going through just because we don’t have any bed space,” Cabrera said.

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Fronteras
1:55 pm
Fri May 23, 2014

Politicos Say Cabinet Position Could Make Or Break Castro

Ryan Loyd TPR News

Fronteras: San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro is President Obama’s pick to head the Department of Housing and Urban Development. One political expert says such a high profile position can make or break a candidate’s political future. Development and drought are creating a duck dilemma in Texas. Also, San Antonio singer Rita Vidaurri  marks her 90th birthday this weekend.

POLITICO: White House Cabinet Positions Can Make or Break a Candidate

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Fronteras
2:55 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Pew: Nearly One-In-Four Hispanics Are Now Former Catholics

Statue at St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church in San Antonio.
Crystal Chavez TPR News

Fronteras: Fewer Hispanics in the U.S. are identifying themselves as Catholic. At the same time more U.S. Catholics are Hispanic. How so? We unravel and explore these trends on this week's show. Also, there’s a common misperception about the fastest-growing minority group in Texas’ capital city. Most people would think that title belongs to Hispanics. While Hispanics are the largest minority group, they are not the fastest-growing there. We look at the diverse and growing Asian-Americans population in Austin.

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Law
2:04 am
Thu May 15, 2014

U.S. Border Patrol's Response To Violence In Question

Patrolling the U.S.-Mexico border can be dangerous. Still, critics say there isn't enough public accountability when Border Patrol agents use deadly force.
Eric Thayer Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 9:55 am

Picnickers in a riverside park in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, react in horror as a man in a yellow baseball cap named Guillermo Arevalo lies on the bank of the Rio Grande, bleeding to death.

It's a warm Monday evening in September 2012. He has just been shot by an agent on a U.S. Border Patrol airboat on the river. The Border Patrol says the agent shot at rock throwers and that the incident is under investigation.

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Fronteras
9:27 am
Mon May 12, 2014

In Tijuana, These Sisters Rule The Boxing Ring

Kristin Wall www.kristinwalldesigns.com via Flickr

Fronteras: More high schools in Texas may start offering Mexican-American studies. Can you guess the political affiliation of a legislator just by looking at them? In Texas, it’s pretty simple. Experts say a new bi-national agreement just signed in San Antonio has the potential to solve a variety of issues. Boxing competes only with soccer as Tijuana’s most popular sport: We’ll hear about two sisters who are slugging their way into the spotlight.

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Fronteras
3:12 pm
Fri May 2, 2014

Amid College Week, Experts Say Higher Educational Attainment Still Low In Bexar County

First Lady Michelle Obama speaking at The University of Texas at San Antonio Friday for College Week.
Joey Palacios TPR News

Fronteras: About two months ago the world’s most wanted drug trafficker, Sinaloa Cartel leader "El Chapo" Guzmán, was captured in a joint operation and Mexico won’t even consider sending Guzmán to face charges in the U.S. It's been about a year since a formal border crossing linking Big Bend National Park and the tiny Mexican village of Boquillas del Carmen was re-opened. The economy there had been suffering but now that tourist dollars have started flowing south again hopes are high in the tourist town. Also, this is College Week in San Antonio.

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Fronteras
12:00 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

New Book Sounds Alarm On Growing "Border Patrol Nation"

Fronteras: The number of U.S. Border Patrol agents has been growing rapidly — and not just along the southern border with Mexico. We speak to Todd Miller author of the new book, “Border Patrol Nation,” about the agency's expanding reach and the implications for privacy rights, civil liberties and more. On a lighter note, taking pictures in a field of Bluebonnets is a favorite springtime tradition in Texas. But we take you to one town that is especially serious about its bluebonnets.

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Fronteras
12:00 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Colorado River Adventures Turn Deadly For Kayakers Without Guides

A group of paddlers prepare for their first rapid.
Laurel Morales Fronteras

Fronteras: Legislation to compensate "downwinders" -- people suffering from cancer caused by the fallout of atomic testing near Las Vegas in the 50s -- left out some affected areas and now people are demanding federal compensation. In Phoenix, there's a unique tradition of bringing together both Jews and Latinos to celebrate Passover that brings together two ethnic communities. The last 10 fatalities on the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon have been on self-guided trips.

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