Border & Immigration

Paul Flahive / Texas Public Radio

This week on Fronteras: 

--A look at how undocumented immigrants without social security numbers pay taxes, and why the IRS doesn’t disclose their identities.

--A legal border crossing in Texas stimulates economies and relations on both sides as it celebrates the second anniversary of its opening.

--Mexican teachers experience Houston classrooms in an international, cultural exchange program.

--A unique protest in support of an arrested Cuban artist brings museums together in solidarity.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

  To work in the United States, immigrants who are here illegally often use false social security numbers or ones that belong to other people.  Then many file their income tax returns using a special number provided by the IRS.  Those immigrants can file their taxes without fear of deportation as the IRS doesn’t report their illegal status to homeland security.

Courtesy The U.S. Air Force / Wikimedia Commons

AUSTIN — A former border security contractor in Texas says there was “spying on Mexico” during aerial surveillance missions and urged caution with state officials over that disclosure, though state security officials said the wording was a mischaracterization of the operation, a newspaper reported Monday.

The “spying” reference was contained in a November 2010 report to the Texas Department of Public Safety during a period of heightened border violence, and obtained by the Austin American-Statesman.

Abrams Learning and Information Systems, which the state hired in 2006 to bring military know-how to state border security efforts, told state officials in the memo that they “need to be careful here as we are admitting to spying on Mexico.”

ROBSTOWN, Texas — A former South Texas reserve deputy is accused of trying to smuggle several non-U.S. citizens into the country.

Federal court documents show Robstown police arrested Luis Enrique Guevara after authorities found three Guatemalan citizens inside the vehicle he was driving. Officers had pulled Guevara over for speeding and for having electronic devices on his dashboard that obstructed his view from the windshield.

Doualy Xaykaothao / KERA

-- It’s been more than four years since President Obama signed the Affordable Care Act. More than 11 million people have signed up for health insurance, but there are still Latinos in Texas who are uninsured.

-- In New Mexico, another healthcare dilemma — a behavioral health provider will end its programs just two years after opening, leaving many criminal offenders without services.

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