Border & Immigration

Fronteras Desk
10:50 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Border Drug Series: From Cartel To End User

On Sept. 6, 2013, CBP officers at the Otay Mesa commercial port of entry discovered 1,623 pounds of marijuana in a shipment of limes.
Courtesy of CBP

Fronteras: First we look at the link between cartels and the end user, addicts. San Diego as a number one entry point for meth. How trucking companies and law enforcement try to keep up with the evolving business of drug smuggling. A smuggling ring revealed that operated from Arizona to Washington State.

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Fronteras Desk
12:25 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

The Obstacles Of Getting Non-English Speakers Signed Up For Health Care

Volunteers with Enroll America's outreach campaign knock on doors in Phoenix.
Jude Joffe-Block

Fronteras: The federal government is poised to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on new border security technology -- how the contracting process has changed and how some contractors are already seeing dollar signs. The challenges of getting the word out on signing up for health care to non-English speakers across the Southwest. Also, a look at Nevada's new push to improve education for its English language learners.

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Fronteras Desk
12:11 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

New Mexico Mental Health System Shakeup Under Scrutiny

Sidonie Squier, head of New Mexico's Human Services Department, defended the decision to freeze Medicaid funds at a Legislative Finance Committee hearing in July.
Bryant Furlow

Fronteras: New Mexico accused 15 of it's mental health providers of Medicaid fraud, froze all federal funds to the agencies, and handed management of the companies over to Arizona firms. Some say the transition isn't going so well. We remember an activist who spoke up for the people who find themselves stranded and destitute in Tijuana after being deported from the U.S. Catholic leaders are hoping a nationwide immigration mass will sway Congress on immigration reform. Also, the Navajo Nation is trying to balance resources with feral horse roundups.

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Border & Immigration
11:25 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Nationwide Immigration Mass Hopes To Sway Congress

The San Fernando Cathedral in San Antonio.
Ryan Loyd TPR News

In response to a call from the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, dioceses across the country will celebrate Mass with an immigration theme this coming Sunday. As the immigration debate continues this month, the church wants its prayers answered by Congress.

Dioceses in 22 states are participating. Kevin Appleby is the director of migration policy for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. 

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Fronteras Desk
11:18 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Tensions Rising In Texas-Mexico Water Dispute

The Francisco I. Madero Dam outside Delicias, Chihuahua overflowed after four days of record rain in late July. This water will eventually flow downstream to the Rio Grande River.
Mónica Ortiz Uribe Fronteras

Fronteras: Farmers in South Texas are angry with Mexico, part of a water dispute that’s fueling tensions between the two nations. Dubbed the "anti-Arizona" bill, California’s TRUST Act is moving toward passage. A closer look at that train that derailed in Mexico. Also, the influence of Asian immigrants has brought new flavors to Las Vegas tacos.

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Fronteras Desk
11:34 am
Fri August 23, 2013

All Things Taco: Kosher Tacos, Breakfast Tacos & Navajo Tacos

A bacon, egg, potato, and cheese taco.
Joey Palacios TPR News

Fronteras: Remember those hard-shelled, spicy ground beef tacos that populated American kitchens a few decades ago? That's not the taco of today. Today it's grilled fish, kosher beef, Korean barbeque and fried eggs. We’re talking all things taco: From the evolution of the taco and how breakfast tacos are a morning staple close to the heart in South Texas, to Kosher tacos and tacos in the Navajo Nation.

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Fronteras Desk
11:42 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Immigrant Families With Mixed Legal Status In Limbo

Cynthia Alba, 19, is working legally in the United States for the first time after receiving deferred action last year. She said the possibility that immigration reform will stall once again, and her deferred action work permit will expire, terrifies her.
Heath Haussamen

Fronteras: Excessive alcohol consumption cost United States taxpayers more than $220 billion in 2006. Several hundred people living on the banks of the Tijuana river canal were evicted. What are they planning to do now? Immigrant families in the U.S. with mixed status wonder about the fate of immigration reform now that Congress is in recess. One of Mexico’s most isolated indigenous groups is fighting logging in old-growth forests. Also, hear how a civil rights giant is now a comic book hero.

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Fronteras Desk
11:51 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Immigration Reform Putting Some Republicans In Hot Seat

Dueling protests may be the norm for some congresspeople being targeted by groups on opposite sides of the immigration reform debate
Jill Replogle Fronteras

Fronteras: Any new immigration bill will include some measure of increased border surveillance, which doesn't sit well with people already fed up with federal scrutiny. As members of Congress begin their August break, many will be getting an earful from constituents about immigration reform. A college in Southern Nevada is struggling to meet the needs of its growing Latino student body. Part of the Navajo Nation has been slow to rebuild after a development freeze, which is affecting some of the poorest people on the reservation.

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Border & Immigration
3:22 pm
Wed August 7, 2013

Latinas Gaining More And More Economic Power In The U.S.

2013 U.S. female population distribution by age. Blue=Total females, Green=Latinas.
Nielsen

A report released this week by Nielsen titled Latina Powershift says that Latinas are an economic power and may define the next American generation.

The report says U.S. Hispanic women have recently and rapidly surfaced as prominent contributors to the educational, economic, and cultural wellbeing of not only their own ethnicity, but of American society and the consumer marketplace.

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Border & Immigration
10:40 am
Tue August 6, 2013

Census Study Says Non-English Speaking Growing In U.S.

Percentage of people 5 years and over who spoke a language other than english at home.
U.S. Census Bureau

A new U.S. Census report shows a growing number of U.S. residents speak a language at home other than English as the level of English proficiency in the nation holds steady.

The report, Language Use in the United States: 2011, says the percentage of people speaking a non-English language increased from 19.7 percent in 2007 to 20.8 percent in 2011. 58 percent of U.S. residents that speak a foreign language at home also speak English very well.

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