Border & Immigration

Katie Schoolov

On Fronteras:

-- President Obama has kept his promise. He took executive action on the nation’s immigration laws. We get reaction from San Antonio, Texas.

-- Anguish is mounting over the Mexican government’s response to the collective murders of 43 college students. The protests aren’t letting up and there’s a sense that this incident has started a movement that is going to stick.

-- We’ll hear how one school district in north Texas is educating a growing number of immigrant children, whose primary language isn’t English.

-City Heights could be San Diego’s “richest-poor” neighborhood. There’s been decades of philanthropic investment there. Two foundations have spent more than a quarter of a billion dollars in City Heights since 2000. So what's become of all that money? Are its residents better off?

Outgoing Lt. Governor, David Dewhurst, has announced that the state will begin ramping down the number of National Guard troops assisting with the state’s border surge in the Rio Grande Valley, that's following an $86 million extension of the executive order that first sent the Guard to the Texas-Mexico border.

He isn’t able to discuss the numbers, but Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst chalks the gradual troop withdrawal to a drop in the number of crossings happening in South Texas.

Cindy Cornett Seigle via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

On Fronteras:

  • We meet a Dallas public high school student from the Democratic Republic of Congo. He tells us about the challenges of fitting in at school here.
  • If a lawsuit against the Border Patrol moves forward, individual agents could be sued over their actions during so called "roving patrol" stops. A Texas case against the Border Patrol may set an important precedent. We have the details.
  • Also, Congressman Lloyd Doggett speaks about the release this week of an immigrant rights activist from San Antonio.

David Martin Davies / TPR News

On Fronteras:
-- There was a lot of expectation and many predictions about the so-called “Latino vote” in the 2014 elections. We get a full recap from the polling and research firm, Latino Decisions.
-- Federal officials say the sickest five percent of Americans rack up more than half of all health care costs. We report on a program in San Diego that’s reducing emergency room visits and improving people’s health.
-- Rattlesnakes are just a part of life in West Texas. Most people try to steer clear of them. We meet a Fort Davis man with a love for snakes, who says they’re just misunderstood.

National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc.

On Fronteras-- Latinas are less likely to develop breast cancer than other ethnic groups. Now researchers think they know why. A new study shows a genetic variant may protect some Hispanic women from developing breast cancer. The largest immigrant detention facility in the country is under construction in South Texas. What’s unusual, though, is how the government bypassed the regular bidding process, giving the contract to a small Arizona town.

Pages