Environment

As part of Texas Public Radio's on-going focus on the environment, we are proud to bring the public and our members special events, stories and initiatives to help improve and draw attention to the city's health and environment.

Every summer there is a drop in the water level of the Edwards Aquifer. This is one of the most prolific artesian aquifers in the world. It is the main source of drinking water for San Antonio and over two million people.

But when the water level drops too low springs in Central Texas stop flowing.

And the aquifer is about at the point for one special spring that has cultural, historical and spiritual significance.

Christine Hawkes says her work isn’t all that glamorous.

“Sometimes when people ask me what my job is, I say 'digging holes,'” she says. "You know? It’s a lot of what I do is just digging up soil.”

President Trump announced Thursday that the U.S. will leave the Paris climate deal.

Here are five things that could be affected by the decision.

1. The coal industry

Even coal companies had lobbied the Trump administration to stay in the agreement.

Editor's Note: This story was originally published in December 2015 and was republished with minor updates ahead of President Trump's decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate agreement. Some of the information on approval by individual governments has been changed to reflect changes in status.

Since Scott Pruitt has taken the reigns of the Environmental Protection Agency, the agency has rolled back regulations, scrubbed information on global warming from its website and dismissed members of a key science advisory board. But that isn’t enough for some climate change skeptics and fossil fuel advocates, who would like to see the EPA rescind its entire rationale for battling global warming.

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