Environment

As part of Texas Public Radio's on-going focus on the environment, we are proud to bring the public and our members special events, stories and initiatives to help improve and draw attention to the city's health and environment.

Jon Alonzo

 

Friends of the Bracken Bat Cave can breathe a little easier today, now that a threatened encroachment by a high-density housing development is officially over.

That's because the real estate deal closed Friday, transferring the land from Galo Properties to the Nature Conservancy.

Defendants of the Bracken Cave have been working on this deal for more than a year.  The effort was spearheaded by San Antonio City Councilman Ron Nirenberg, who took up the challenge to visit the cave right after he was elected in 2013.

Marfa Public Radio

A team of scientists at Texas A&M is working on an "aquaponics” project to demonstrate a lower-cost method of growing vegetables – and raising fish.

The method is not new – but scientists are hoping to attract home gardeners and entrepreneurs to the field of soilless food production.

Jacqueline Ferrato / Bat Conservation International

 

San Antonio City Councilman Ron Nirenberg announced an agreement last week to protect the world’s largest bat cave from encroachment by future development.

The city will join with several other entities to turn the 1,500-acre property, known as Crescent Hills, into a conservation easement that will permanently protect the area’s natural resources. 

Jack Morgan

As Texas slowly begins its cool-down, many people turn their thoughts toward landscaping in the fall and  winter.  Landscaping is tough work, but there are things you can do to make it easier, and also cheaper. How? Well, you need to go native.   

“Native Plant Week is a week that has been designated to make people more aware of using native plants in their landscape.”

Mary Moses is with Comal County’s Native Plant Society of Texas.

“Using Native Plants makes for a healthier habitat that supports wildlife. Bees…it just makes the earth more healthy.”

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

One San Antonio woman is relieved that her bee problem is finally gone. But Norma Ramon now knows not to call any more exterminators if honey bees invade her home. She'll call the "Bee Whisperer."

After months of honey bees building a hive that grew to at least 4 feet by 2 feet, 150,000 bees would not go away even after exterminators tried to kill them off.

"I had a couple of companies come out and work on it and they tried their best, they really did, and nothing happened," she said.

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