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COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Mexican free-tailed bats kicked out of Texas A&M University’s Kyle Field have found a new home across the street.

The state's official flying mammal, which had migrated south of the Texas border, returned this spring to discover part of its home was gone and other entrances were blocked with nets to keep them out. The stadium is under construction in a $485 million renovation project.

The Bryan-College Station-based The Eagle reports the bats now have begun roosting and hanging out around campus. Their relocation caused a temporary shutdown last week of a swimming pool in the school's recreational center.

Scott Newton / Wikimedia Commons

DALLAS — Plans are in the works in Dallas for an art piece honoring blues guitarist brothers Stevie Ray and Jimmie Vaughan at a park located just blocks from the home where they grew up.

The Dallas Morning News reports that documentary filmmaker Kirby Warnock has been working since last year with Kay Kallos, the public art program manager in the City of Dallas’ Office of Cultural Affairs, to secure a spot in the Oak Cliff neighborhood’s Kiest Park to honor the late Stevie Ray Vaughan and his older brother, Jimmie.

It's “been a long, slow slog,” says Warnock, whose 2013 documentary When Dallas Rocked lamented the lack of a Stevie Ray Vaughan memorial in Dallas. “But it will be worth it.”

Stevie Ray Vaughan, a two-time Grammy winner, was killed in a 1990 helicopter crash at the age of 35. This month he’s set to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Warnock’s website on the project says it has the approval of Jimmie Vaughan.

Erik Charlton / Wikimedia Commons

AUGUSTA, Ga. — The green jacket belongs to Jordan Spieth.

Spieth finished off the first wire-to-wire victory at the Masters since 1976 with a dominating four-stroke triumph Sunday. About the only thing that didn't go his way was the final hole, where he made a bogey to merely tie the tournament scoring record. Tiger Woods won his first green jacket in 1997 with an 18-under 270. Spieth matched that score with a closing 70.

It was a thoroughly dominating performance from start to finish. Spieth seized control with an 8-under 64, the best opening round at the Masters in 19 years. Perhaps it was only appropriate that Spieth finished off a wire-to-wire victory with another record. He set Masters scoring records for both 36 holes (14-under 130) and 54 holes (16-under 210).

Spieth also set a Masters record with 27 birdies, two more than Phil Mickelson's mark of 25 from 2001. Spieth had gone to the 16th hole with a four-stroke lead on Justin Rose and a five-shot edge on Mickelson.

Mickelson and Justin Rose tied for the runner-up spot. Rory McIlroy was six shots back. No one got closer than three shots throughout the final round.

Spieth reached unprecedented territory at the Masters early Sunday evening. With a birdie at the 15th hole, he became the first player in Augusta National history to get to 19-under par.

Why Texas Matters, And Will Clinton Consider A VP Pick From The State?

Apr 12, 2015
Julián Castro Twitter account

The last Democratic presidential nominee to seriously campaign in Texas in a general election was a Clinton. But it’s been nearly two decades since President Bill Clinton stormed through Fort Worth’s Sundance Square for a late-September campaign rally.  

His wife, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, finds a totally different Texas as she embarks on her own presidential run — a Republican-dominated state relegated to the backwater of Democratic campaign blitzes. 

National Democrats aren’t deluding themselves into thinking they have a real chance here in 2016, and Republicans are not concerned about losing the state to Clinton or anyone else. 

M. Chohan / Wikimedia Commons

BAGHDAD — Islamic State militants hammered, bulldozed and ultimately blew up parts of the ancient Iraqi Assyrian city of Nimrud, destroying a site dating back to the 13th century B.C., an online militant video purportedly shows.

The destruction at Nimrud, located near the militant-held city of Mosul, came amid other attacks on antiquity carried out by the group now holding a third of Iraq and neighboring Syria in its self-declared caliphate.

The seven-minute video, posted late Saturday, shows bearded militants using sledgehammers, jackhammers and saws to take down huge alabaster reliefs depicting Assyrian kings and deities. A bulldozer brings down walls, while militants fill barrels with explosives and later destroy three separate areas of the site in massive explosions.

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