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The Kennedy Assassination, 50 Years Later
3:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

50 Years After Assassination, Kennedy Books Offer New Analysis

President John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jacqueline, are greeted by an enthusiastic crowd upon their arrival at Dallas Love Field on Nov. 22, 1963.
AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 5:27 pm

In the 50 years since the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the public has never tired of books about the charismatic young president and his tragic death.

This year, the market has been particularly flooded with Kennedy books — from glossy photograph collections to serious biographies and histories to a new round of books devoted to conspiracy theories.

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NPR Story
3:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Inseparable Abandoned Dogs Need A Home

(Chester County SPCA)

They say a dog is man’s best friend, but don’t tell that to Jermaine. Jermaine’s best friend is his blind brother Jeffrey. The two are inseparable.

Here & Now’s Robin Young takes a couple of minutes to draw attention to the huge problem of abandoned animals, and the attention that these two 8-month-old pit bull mix dogs have drawn, because of a picture that’s gone viral.

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NPR Story
3:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Japanese Animator's Film Causes Controversy

The latest film from celebrated Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki, "The Wind Rises," centers on the engineer who designed the plane used in the kamikaze attacks during World War II. (Studio Ghibli/Walt Disney)

What may be the final film from acclaimed Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki is a departure from his earlier fantasies.

“The Wind Rises” tells the story of a real-life airplane designer who created what some say was the best fighter plane of WWII. The film has proved controversial in Japan, and opens briefly in the U.S. this month to qualify for an Oscar nomination.

Allen Yu, KROC Fellowship winner for NPR, has our story.

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NPR Story
3:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Will Sugar Be The FDA's Next Target?

(Ninja M/Flickr)

The Food and Drug Administration is taking steps to further reduce trans fats in processed foods — a move that would require food companies to prove hydrogenated oils harmless before using them in products.

These days, most consumers consider this a good thing, but trans fats have historically been championed as a healthier alternative to butter and lard. It wasn’t until the 1990s that studies began to link trans fats to heart attacks and disease.

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Around the Nation
3:44 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Midwestern States Sort Through Aftermath Of Scores Of Tornadoes

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 5:27 pm

Scores of tornados touched down across the Midwest on Sunday, leveling homes and killing at least eight.

The Salt
3:16 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Meat Mummies: How Ancient Egyptians Prepared Feasts For Afterlife

Anyone up for meat mummies? Above, a mummified beef rib from the tomb of Tjuiu, an Egyptian noblewoman, and her husband, the powerful courtier Yuya, circa 1386-1349 BC.
Image courtesy of PNAS

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 11:25 am

Meat mummies.

It's a word pairing that is, I dare say, pretty rare. Who among us has heard those two words together? What, indeed, could a "meat mummy" be?

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Shots - Health News
3:12 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Using Birth Control Pills May Increase Women's Glaucoma Risk

Estrogen affects cells in the eye's retina, which may help explain a possible link between glaucoma and estrogen levels.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 10:37 am

Taking birth control pills may increase a woman's risk of eye disease later in life, a study finds, because they may reduce protective levels of estrogen.

Doctors have long known that cells in the eye have estrogen receptors. But in the past few years they've started looking into whether the changes in a woman's estrogen levels as she goes through life could affect her risk of glaucoma.

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New In Paperback
3:10 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Nov. 18-24: Famine, Family And A Song Of Lament And Hope

Free Press

*Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's All Politics
2:47 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

How Would Your City Handle A Mayor Like Rob Ford?

Mayor Rob Ford talks during a City Council debate in Toronto on Nov. 13.
Nathan Denette AP

If an American city had a mayor as embarrassing as Rob Ford of Toronto, whose problems with drugs and alcohol have caused an international sensation, it could get rid of him.

Probably.

Recalls of local elected officials have become more common in the U.S. over the past few years.

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Author Interviews
2:46 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

'Promised Land' Wrestles With Israel's Brutal Contradictions

Israeli soldiers work from a Gaza Strip watchtower.
Gali Tibbon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 8:01 am

In his new book My Promised Land: The Triumph and Tragedy of Israel, Israeli journalist Ari Shavit tackles several basic questions: Why was Israel created? What has it achieved? What went wrong? Where is it heading? Will it survive?

The book is based on interviews with hundreds of Israelis — Jews and Arabs — as well as his own story and family history (two of Shavit's great-grandfathers became Zionists in the late 1800s).

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