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Author Interviews
6:58 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Mark Twain's Famous Outcasts Float Through Three Centuries

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Author Interviews
6:58 am
Sat May 17, 2014

'Wynne's War,' A Modern Take On The Classic 'Mideastern'

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Aaron Gwyn has written a novel about modern man at war on horses. He calls it a mideastern. "Wynne's War" is the story of a U.S. Army Ranger from Okla., Elijah Russell, whose stellar horsemanship gets him assigned to train Green Berets for a special mission in Afghanistan, a horseback raid on the Taliban in treacherous mountain territory.

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The Two-Way
6:54 am
Sat May 17, 2014

NAACP Selects Minister, Former Lawyer, As New President

Cornell William Brooks at the 2013 New Jersey Institute for Social Justice gala.
NJISJ

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 9:21 am

The board of directors for the NAACP announced it has selected Cornell William Brooks as its new president and CEO.

"Mr. Brooks is a pioneering lawyer and civil rights leader, who brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the Association," Roslyn M. Brock, Chairman of the NAACP Board of Directors, said in a statement. "We look forward to leveraging his legal prowess, vision and leadership as we tackle the pressing civil rights issues of the 21st century."

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Code Switch
4:39 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Nostalgia For What's Been Lost Since 'Brown V. Board'

This racially segregated Monroe Elementary School class from March 1953 shows Linda and Terry Lynn Brown, who, with their parents, initiated the Brown v. Board of Education case that helped propel school integration.
Carl Iwasaki Getty Image

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 12:41 pm

Brown v. Board of Education became the law of the land when it struck down de jure segregation in Topeka, Kan., on May 17, 1954, saying, "We conclude that, in the field of public education, the doctrine of 'separate but equal' has no place. Separate facilities are inherently unequal."

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All Tech Considered
4:37 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Tech Week: The Right To Be Forgotten And The Open Internet

Protesters hold a rally to support net neutrality at the Federal Communications Commission building in Washington, D.C.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

It's that time again! Just as we do every weekend, let's take a look back at the week's big technology headlines from NPR and beyond.

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Parallels
4:33 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Nigerian Abductions Part Of A Terrible Pattern In African Conflicts

A still image taken from a video that the extremist group Boko Haram says is of more than 100 girls who were abducted from a Nigerian school last month. Rebel kidnappings of girls has become increasingly common in African conflicts.
AFP/YouTube

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 1:40 pm

The girls at St. Mary's slept uneasily that night. Rebels were rumored to be nearby and planning an attack. Calls for protection by school administrators to a nearby army outpost went unanswered.

By nightfall, all the girls "prayed to God and asked Him to take control of our lives," a 16-year-old would later tell a reporter. During the night, the girls heard boots. Then gunfire. Rough men's voices threatened to toss grenades through the dormitory windows if they didn't unlock the doors.

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The Two-Way
7:40 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Apple, Google, Agree To Drop Patent Infringement Dispute

Apple and Google have agreed to settle a patent infringement suit over smartphone technology.
Karly Domb Sadof AP

Apple and Google have agreed to drop perhaps the highest-profile lawsuit in high-tech, ending litigation over smartphone patents.

"Apple and Google have agreed to dismiss all the current lawsuits that exist directly between the two companies," the tech giants said in a joint statement on Friday. The two firms added that they "have also agreed to work together in some areas of patent reform."

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Code Switch
5:42 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Federal Goverment Jeopardizes Navajo Family's Ties To Its Home

Navajo elder Stella Peshlakai Smith, 89, stands at a traditional dwelling on her homestead at Wupatki National Monument in 2014. The National Park Service says her children cannot stay when she dies.
Felicia Fonseca AP

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 9:46 am

At 89 years old, Stella Peshlakai Smith shuffles around her Arizona yard in white tennis shoes and a long traditional Navajo skirt. She points to her ceremonial home, called a hogan. "My father made this one [almost 100 years ago]," Smith says. Her modern house sits next door.

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The Two-Way
5:33 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Arkansas Supreme Court Suspends Ruling Allowing Gay Marriage

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:12 pm

Same-sex marriage is off again in Arkansas.

The state's Supreme Court on Friday suspended a lower court's decision striking down a 2004 ban on gay marriage. So, no more marriage licenses will be issued to same-sex couples — at least for now.

Last week, Pulaski County Circuit Court Judge Chris Piazza voided the state's gay-marriage ban but left in place another law that prohibited county clerks from issuing licenses to same-sex couples.

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This Week's Must Read
4:41 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

A 'New York Times' Shake-Up, But Not The One You're Thinking Of

Taxis speed past the headquarters of the New York Times.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:51 am

It's not all that often that the New York Times goes from printing the biggest stories of the day to actually being the biggest story of the day. But that's exactly what happened this week when the publisher, Arthur Sulzberger Jr. replaced Jill Abramson as the executive editor.

The Times has dealt with big problems before. I'm thinking of course about about Jayson Blair. Seth Mnookin's book, Hard News, is the definitive account of that saga. It's the story of an old line institution that allowed a snake to slip through unnoticed.

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