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The Two-Way
12:01 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Soyuz Misfire Delays Crew Trying To Reach Space Station

From left: U.S. astronaut Steve Swanson, and Russian cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev prior to the launch of their Soyuz-FG rocket Wednesday at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 12:18 pm

A problem with a thruster aboard a Russian Soyuz capsule ferrying one American and two Russians to the International Space Station has caused an unexpected delay for the crew in reaching the orbiting platform.

As NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports, it was supposed to be a six-hour journey from the launch at Kazakhstan's Baikonur Cosmodrome to the ISS, but one of the thrusters didn't fire at the right time.

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The Two-Way
11:51 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Photo: Pothole Tries To Eat Pothole Repair Truck

Ka-thunk. This pothole repair crew in East Lansing, Mich., met its match.
Robert Boomer Facebook.com/bikerboomer

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 4:01 pm

There's just something oddly appropriate about this photo from East Lansing, Mich., after a winter that's been so hard for so many people across the nation.

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Shots - Health News
11:22 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Bogus Pills Found In Bottles Of Weight-Loss Drug In 7 States

The package for the weight-loss drug alli should look like this.
Courtesy of GlaxoSmithKline

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 11:57 am

The pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline warned consumers that some lots of alli, its over-the-counter weight loss drug, appear to have been tampered with after people reported finding the wrong pills in bottles.

The bogus pills were found in bottles bought in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina and Texas, GlaxoSmithKline reported on Wednesday.

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Shots - Health News
11:18 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Fewer People Are Getting Infections In Hospitals, But Many Still Die

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 7:24 pm

Hospital-acquired infections continue to be a big problem in health care, with 4 percent of patients getting a new infection while hospitalized, a study finds. And 11 percent of those infections turn deadly.

It's the first time that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has attempted to catalog all hospital infections, not just the infections with germs on their watch list. Researchers surveyed 183 hospitals nationwide, emphasizing smaller community hospitals.

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Africa
10:48 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Polygamy May Seem Like A Man's Dream, But Kenyan Women Are Not Happy

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 11:41 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Technology
10:46 am
Wed March 26, 2014

The Changing World Of Tech Requires A Woman's Eye

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 1:09 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Author Interviews
10:46 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Walter Mosley: To End Race, We Have To Recognize 'White' Doesn't Exist

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 11:41 am

Walter Mosley's writing inspired Hollywood filmmakers and a generation of black writers. He's now being honored at the National Black Writers' Conference. He talks about the award and his new book.

Education
10:46 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Despite Financial Challenges, HBCUs Fight To Remain A Bargain

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 11:41 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. It's the college admissions season. So this spring, we're joining our colleagues at Morning Edition to talk about the challenge of paying for higher education. And we're not just talking about the problem, though, we're trying to offer practical advice to get around that money maze. Today we want to focus on historically black colleges and universities - HBCUs.

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The Two-Way
10:39 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Bin Laden's Son-In-Law Convicted Of Conspiring To Kill Americans

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith appears in this still image taken from an undated video address for al-Qaida.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 5:58 pm

Osama bin Laden's son-in-law was found guilty Wednesday of conspiring to kill Americans by serving as a spokesman for al-Qaida following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

The verdict in Manhattan federal court ended a three-week trial in which Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, 48, was portrayed as a reluctant operative who had no prior knowledge of the attacks.

The Kuwait-born Abu Ghaith, a onetime imam, faces life in prison.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
10:26 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Debate: Does Affirmative Action On Campus Do More Harm Than Good?

Martha Stewart Intelligence Squared U.S.
  • Listen To The Full Audio Of The Debate
  • Listen To The Broadcast Version Of The Debate

Many colleges and universities use race as a factor in admissions, but the approach has been a hot-button issue for decades — even making its way to the Supreme Court several times since the late 1970s.

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