Camille Phillips

Education Reporter

Camille Phillips covers education for Texas Public Radio.

She previously worked at St. Louis Public Radio, where she reported on the racial unrest in Ferguson, the impact of the opioid crisis and, most recently, education.

Camille was part of the news team that won a national Edward R. Murrow and a Peabody Award for One Year in Ferguson, a multi-media reporting project. She also won a regional Murrow for contributing to St. Louis Public Radio’s continuing coverage on the winter floods of 2016.

Her work has aired on NPR’s "Morning Edition" and national newscasts, as well as public radio stations in Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska.

Camille grew up in southwest Missouri and moved to New York City after college. She taught middle school Spanish in the Bronx before beginning her journalism career.

She has an undergraduate degree from Truman State University and a master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Education News Fund, including H-E-B, Art and Sandy Nicholson, The Flohr Family Foundation, Holly and Alston Beinhorn, Valero Energy Foundation, 2Tarts Bakery in New Braunfels, Andeavor, and IDEA Public Schools. Other contributors include Shari Albright, Holt Cat and Dee Howard Foundation.

Ways to Connect

NAACP President Derrick Johnson speaks at an opening session of the civil right organization's annual convention in San Antonio July 16, 2018.
Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Thousands of people from across the country are in downtown San Antonio this week for the annual convention of the NAACP.

The 109th gathering of the civil rights organization is focused on voting and civic engagement, with a theme of “Defeat Hate. Vote."

Camille Phillips / Texas Public Radio

Five days into his new role as superintendent of Edgewood Independent School District, Eduardo Hernandez said he plans to spend the next 95 days listening, learning and asking three questions:

“What do we as a district need to continue to do? What do we as a district need to start doing? And what do we as a district need to stop doing?” said Hernandez, sitting in his new office on San Antonio’s west side.

Fabrice Florin / WikiCommons| http://bit.ly/2uwI0ma

Students who survived the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, joined young activists from Texas in a series of panel discussions on gun control last week.

Their vision for gun violence prevention is in stark contrast with state lawmakers’ plans.

 


A mosaic featuring Robert E. Lee's image given as a senior class gift is among the items for sale at Lee High School's online auction. The district is putting a smaller replica in a museum in LEE's library.
North East ISD

North East Independent School District’s decision to remove the name of Confederate General Robert E. Lee from one of its high schools is again stirring controversy.

A Facebook post promoting an online auction of items featuring the school’s old name and logo is drawing a strong reaction, especially from alumni who opposed the name change and don’t think the district should profit from it.


Town hall panelists from left to right: Aayana Ragland, Janie Esparza, Sophia Mendez, Selina Eshraghi, Kelly Choi, Bria Smith, Ryan Deitsch and Cameron Kasky.
Camille Phillips / Texas Public Radio

Student gun control activists from Parkland, Florida, stopped in San Antonio Monday evening as part of a national Road to Change summer tour.

They joined state and local activists for a panel discussion that focused on bringing change to a red state known for its pro-gun-rights politicians.


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