Camille Phillips

Education Reporter

Camille Phillips covers education for Texas Public Radio.

She previously worked at St. Louis Public Radio, where she reported on the racial unrest in Ferguson, the impact of the opioid crisis and, most recently, education.

Camille was part of the news team that won a national Edward R. Murrow and a Peabody Award for One Year in Ferguson, a multi-media reporting project. She also won a regional Murrow for contributing to St. Louis Public Radio’s continuing coverage on the winter floods of 2016.

Her work has aired on NPR’s "Morning Edition" and national newscasts, as well as public radio stations in Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska.

Camille grew up in southwest Missouri and moved to New York City after college. She taught middle school Spanish in the Bronx before beginning her journalism career.

She has an undergraduate degree from Truman State University and a master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Education News Fund, including H-E-B, Art and Sandy Nicholson, The Flohr Family Foundation, Holly and Alston Beinhorn, Valero Energy Foundation, 2Tarts Bakery in New Braunfels, Andeavor, and IDEA Public Schools. Other contributors include Shari Albright, Holt Cat and Dee Howard Foundation.

Ways to Connect

Churchill High School students walk out of class to call for tighter gun control laws April 20, 2018.
Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

Hundreds of students at several different San Antonio schools called for an end to gun violence Friday by participating in walkouts and on-campus events.

For many who participated, ending gun violence means tightening gun control.

Robert Livar / Contributed photo

Eighth graders at Great Hearts Monte Vista North charter school Wednesday were assigned homework that suggested there is a positive side to slavery.

The students were told to give a balanced view of the life of slaves by listing the pros and cons.

 


Camille Phillips / Texas Public Radio

Transparency and budget priorities are top of mind for residents of the South San Antonio Independent School District, as the district contemplates asking for a tax increase.

SAISD board  Vice President Arthur Valdez, President Patti Radle and Superintendent Pedro Martinez in January 2018.
File Photo| Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

The board of trustees for the San Antonio Independent School District Monday night approved trimming teacher and administrator positions from its payroll next school year.

But that doesn’t necessarily mean the district will lay off any teachers or assistant principals.

File Photo | Ryan Loyd | TPR News

A $2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Labor is making it a little easier for San Antonio area residents to learn how to code.

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