Camille Phillips

Education Reporter

Camille Phillips covers education for Texas Public Radio.

She previously worked at St. Louis Public Radio, where she reported on the racial unrest in Ferguson, the impact of the opioid crisis and, most recently, education.

Camille was part of the news team that won a national Edward R. Murrow and a Peabody Award for One Year in Ferguson, a multi-media reporting project. She also won a regional Murrow for contributing to St. Louis Public Radio’s continuing coverage on the winter floods of 2016.

Her work has aired on NPR’s "Morning Edition" and national newscasts, as well as public radio stations in Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska.

Camille grew up in southwest Missouri and moved to New York City after college. She taught middle school Spanish in the Bronx before beginning her journalism career.

She has an undergraduate degree from Truman State University and a master’s degree from the Missouri School of Journalism at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Ways to Connect

File Photo | Bob Daemmrich / The Texas Tribune

The chancellor of The University of Texas System is stepping down from his role in 2018.

William McRaven announced his resignation Friday during a special meeting of the UT System board of regents, which was conducted by telephone and broadcast online.

Camille Phillips | Texas Public Radio

As students at The University of Texas at San Antonio cram for finals week, Taylor Eighmy is preparing for a test of his own: the launch of a major initiative to expand the university’s downtown campus


St. Philip's College is now off warning status, as are San Antonio College and Northeast Vista College.
File Photo | Joey Palacios | Texas Public Radio

San Antonio College, Northwest Vista College and St. Philip’s College are no longer at risk of losing their accreditation.

The three schools from the Alamo Colleges District have been taken off warning status by their accrediting organization, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges.


UIW medical student Edwin Davila talks to a Southside ISD student at a family orientation in the fall of 2017.
Provided | Southside ISD

A few weeks into their first semester at University of the Incarnate Word’s School of Osteopathic Medicine, the 162 students in UIW’s inaugural class were paired up with 27 families from the Southside Independent School District.

For the next two years, the medical students will visit or call the parents, grandparents and students every two weeks. The goal is to help the families improve their health in a part of the region that has some of the worst health outcomes in San Antonio.


Pregnancy test
Johannes Jander via Flickr

San Antonio has cut the rate of teen births in half over the past decade, but the city’s rate is still almost 50 percent higher than the national rate, according to a new report from the city’s Metropolitan Health District.

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