Deirdre Saravia

Cultural Content Producer

Deirdre as born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and her first paid work was at the age of 10 with the BBC as an actress on "Children's Hour." She continued to perform regularly on radio and stage for the next eight years, at which point she was informed by her parents that theater was not an option and she needed "real" work.

So Deirdre left the flashy life of entertainment and trained as a registered nurse in Ireland, continuing to London. Her nursing experiences allowed her to travel and work abroad in Europe and Africa, and while working in London for British Petroleum, she met her husband, Dr. Jorge Saravia. They moved to Mexico City where she managed his private practice while learning Spanish.

During her time in Mexico City, she worked as an extra on the movie "Lucky Lady," starring Gene Hackman, Liza Minelli and Burt Reynolds. You can see her fox-trotting in a night club scene, but you have to watch very closely.

After the Saravia family moved to San Antonio, Deirdre volunteered at KRTU 91.7 FM and hosted a World Music program while continuing to work in nursing at Santa Rosa Children's Hospital and University hospital.

Deirdre joined TPR serendipitously, when one evening Thistle and Shamrock failed to air on KSTX. Having just produced an Irish music show for KRTU, she quickly gathered her gear and substituted for Fiona Richie.

Deirdre produces World Music with Deirdre Saravia, which airs Saturday evenings at 8 p.m. on KSTX.

Ways to Connect

Randhirreddy / Wikimedia Commons

Each week on World Music, we not only hear great sounds from around the world, but I share a little news about the many interesting festivals that are taking place this week as well. This week, hear about a flower festival celebrated in India--and right here in San Antonio, as well!

BATHUKAMMA

Christof Berger / Wikimedia Commons

Each week on World Music (Saturday nights from 8-10 on KSTX 89.1 FM), I take a look at celebrations happening around the world. This week, cows battle in Switzerland, and there’s a “vegetarian” festival in Thailand that’s not for the squeamish.

Are the cows taking on the bulls in The Battle of The Queens?

Wikimedia Commons

Each week on World Music (Saturday nights from 8-10 on KSTX 89.1 FM), I take a look at celebrations happening around the world. As September comes to an end, South Africa looks to the sea to celebrate one of the earth’s largest mammals, but in Slovenia, another smaller mammal makes a meal.

HERMANUS WHALE FESTIVAL

Wikimedia Commons

With many sports, you face the real possibility of ending up toothless, but there is one sport where a gummy smile is definitely to your advantage--gurning. Dedicated practitioners of gurning have actually had dental extractions to help them in this rural English—I hesitate to say—sport, but that is how participants view it. This is also an activity where an aged, saggy and lined face is a decided advantage.

Dan Lundberg / Wikimedia Commons

Forget the bathing suits, Cure Salée is for men only.

The Sahara Desert is populated by nomads who use camels for transportation, bring live goats and sheep for fresh victuals as needed, and traverse the land buying and selling. For one week in September, the Tuareg and Fulani tribes gather at In-Gall, a fertile area of salt-laden grass, on which they feed their cattle. (Cows require salt to maintain good health.) This is also an opportunity to meet and mingle, and perhaps find romance.

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