Emily Donahue, KUT News

Emily Donahue is KUT’s news director. She has spent more than two decades in broadcast journalism and launched KUT’s news department in 2001.  Previously, Emily was part of the Peabody-award winning team at Marketplace as producer of the Marketplace Morning Report. Since coming to KUT, Emily has overseen a doubling of the news staff and content, the accumulation of more than 50 local, national and international awards for journalistic excellence and served on several boards, including the Texas Associated Press Broadcasters and as a member of the 2011 Texas Association of Broadcasters Open Government Task Force. Emily lives in Austin and is currently working on her Master’s in Journalism from the University of Texas at Austin.

From Texas Standard:

In times like these, the arc of history is often invoked to make sense of the present. So the narrative goes, the so-called Islamic State arose in the vacuum left after America’s misadventures post-9/11.

Recently, Jon Meacham’s book has been in the news for revelations that George Herbert Walker Bush – Bush 41 – thought his son, W. – Bush 43 – was badly served by Donald Rumsfeld and Dick Cheney. That’s news, especially since the narrative used to be that 43 was just doing his father’s bidding, retribution for an unfinished war.


From Texas Standard:

Texas barbecue, like Texas itself, has many origins. There's the Mexican influence, which you can taste when you bite into a juicy barbacoa taco, and then there's the influence of Germans and Czechs who brought the idea of meat shops and cooking meat over hot coals to the Lone Star State.

What really helped shape our idea of barbecue isn't nearly as well documented or celebrated: the influence of slave populations and their style of cooking.

Where there's smoke, there's Daniel Vaughn. The Texas Monthly barbecue editor stepped in to the Standard's studio to tell us more.

From Texas Standard

Get ready, folks. We're officially a week away from the biggest event in Texas: the Texas Tribune Festival, that annual gathering of the state and nation's political elite with regular Texans who want the inside track on politics and policy.