Jack Morgan

Arts and Culture Reporter

Jack Morgan has spent 35 years in electronic media doing both television and radio.

In his mid 20s he was known as Robbin Banks at two San Angelo FM stations but the bulk of his career has been spent at PBS stations -- from Austin's KLRU, Orlando's WMFE, Burlington's Vermont Public Television, and San Antonio's KLRN.

At KLRN he spent 5 years as director of production where he was responsible for three hour-long programs with the San Antonio Symphony. Jack was also responsible for KLRN's ARTS program during its startup, and co-produced Texas Week With Rick Casey.

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San Antonio River Foundation

The Mission Concepcion Art Portal may well be the city’s single biggest piece of art, and it’s nothing short of enormous. It’s 84 feet wide, and that’s by far the shortest angle. The long angle is a 188 feet. Artist Stacy Levy calls the installation River Return.

“This is a park that sits right between the river and Mission Concepcion. But when you stand here you can’t really see either one of them that easily.”

Full House Productions

The hills are alive with the sounds of music. Those hills are the ones around Kerrville where the Symphony of the Hills is based. Here’s Artistic Director Gene Dowdy on their upcoming concert:

"We’ve themed it Heroes: Real and Imagined. All the music is inspired by or influenced somehow by acts of heroism, heroes or even just ideals."

Dowdy details the concert's contents:

Courtesy of the artist

SOLI Chamber Ensemble’s season begins this week right here in San Antonio.

"SOLI Chamber Ensemble is the only contemporary classical music ensemble in San Antonio, and we present works from 20th and 21st Century composers," says Artistic Director Ertan Torgul. "Most of our work is actually with living composers. We have commissioned 46 new works, and gave premieres of those works in San Antonio for over 20 years.”

Jingu family

You may wonder why the ornate entry gate at San Antonio’s Japanese Tea Garden instead says “Chinese Tea Garden.” The reason links back to a Japanese-American family who once lived in the garden, and altered forever by dramatic events in World War II. The story is a fascinating one, and begins back in 1908 when the future Japanese Tea Garden was just a great big, gaping hole in the ground. It was the remnants of a cement quarry.

Jack Morgan

The Witte’s 100 million dollar re-do continues, but it’s not affecting the exhibit schedule. The  exhibit is beautiful, fascinating, and while it may sound creepy, is really educational. Witte President Marise McDermott talks about the process used to turn donated bodies into the Bodies Revealed exhibit, which is opening Saturday: