Joey Palacios

News Reporter

Born and raised in San Antonio, Joey joined the Texas Public Radio newsroom in October of 2011. Joey graduated from Roosevelt High School and obtained an A.A.S in Radio-Television-Broadcasting from San Antonio College in 2010.

Joey started his broadcasting career  in 2007 at KSYM-90.1 FM as a DJ and later became Program Director of the station. After graduation, he interned at  KTSA-550 AM and was hired as a reporter covering elections, breaking news, and the 2011 legislative session.

For TPR, Joey covers a variety of general assignments including: breaking news, local school districts, higher education, police, fire, capital improvement, non-profits, health care, community issues and local politics. Joey has also had several stories aired on NPR national newscasts.

When not working, Joey enjoys biking, hiking, cooking, and socializing.

Ways to Connect

Lorne Matalon / Marfa Public Radio

This week on Fronteras:    

  •  A high profile anti-U.S.-Mexico pipeline campaign gets underway as the builder is ordered to pay border landowners millions.
  • If you need a passport, it may take a while to get – there’s a backlog.
  • A border school helps students of immigrants bypass college tuition and earn two years of college credits before getting their high school diploma.
  • Honoring World Refugee Day with the success story of an Iraqi refugee who fled death and now helps other immigrants market their skills for American  jobs.

   

Texas Landowners Win Millions As Stars Launch Anti-Pipeline Campaign

In Texas, they say energy is king.  It may still be but right now the crown belongs to West Texas landowners. They just won unexpectedly high awards - millions of dollars  -against Energy Transfer, a U.S. company contracted by Mexico to build a controversial natural gas pipeline. Mexico is paying for the pipeline that will carry Texas natural gas to Mexican power plants. And because the state says the pipeline is in the public interest, that gives the builder the power to seize private land here.  Despite winning lucrative awards for the pipeline being built on their property, the landowners really don’t want it and they’re getting some huge help.  A high profile anti-pipeline campaign is underway – fueled by the power of Hollywood. The story from Marfa Public Radio’s Fronteras reporter Lorne Matalon.The Story 

State Department

The U.S. State Department is expecting a 33 percent increase in passport renewals over the next year. That means it could take longer to get a passport.

About six years after 9/11 passports were required for the first time to enter Mexico and Canada.

Passports have a life of about ten years before they need to be renewed making the number of renewals anticipated this year a near tidal wave.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Protestors and supporters of Donald Trump crowded Fredericksburg Road Friday afternoon as the presumptive Republican nominee spoke at a private fundraiser. San Antonio residents were able to conduct a peaceful protest without violence.

Sounds of dissent and support of Donald Trump’s visit echoed on both sides of Fredericksburg Road. From the protestors who chanted "Racist Go Home," to the supporters who yelled "Go, Trump Go."

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Thursday night, San Antonio Mayor Ivy Taylor was booed and jeered while speaking at a vigil at Crockett Park for the 49 Orlando terror attack victims. A few members of the LGBT community say Taylor had no business being there.

Mayor Taylor was invited to the vigil by the organizers, Pride Center San Antonio. It’s the first time she’s been invited to an LGBT event.

But while leading a prayer, several people turned their backs to the Mayor and others heckled.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

City leaders and the San Antonio Police Officer’s Association are praising a long-awaited deal on a new contract.  There are some concessions on each side but both welcomed the end of two years of negotiations at a City Hall press conference Wednesday. 

 

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