Joey Palacios

News Reporter

Born and raised in San Antonio, Joey joined the Texas Public Radio newsroom in October of 2011. Joey graduated from Roosevelt High School and obtained an A.A.S in Radio-Television-Broadcasting from San Antonio College in 2010.

Joey started his broadcasting career  in 2007 at KSYM-90.1 FM as a DJ and later became Program Director of the station. After graduation, he interned at  KTSA-550 AM and was hired as a reporter covering elections, breaking news, and the 2011 legislative session.

For TPR, Joey covers a variety of general assignments including: breaking news, local school districts, higher education, police, fire, capital improvement, non-profits, health care, community issues and local politics. Joey has also had several stories aired on NPR national newscasts.

When not working, Joey enjoys biking, hiking, cooking, and socializing.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy / McMahan Family

A five-year-old boy is one of the last victims from the Sutherland Springs shooting that remains hospitalized. Now family members believe he could be out of San Antonio’s University Hospital in a few weeks.  

 


The San Antonio City Council approved a multi-million dollar incentive package for the United Services Automobile Association to bring nearly 2,000 employees downtown within the next five years.

 

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

San Antonio uses a ratio of one taxi cab for every 1,700 people in the city to determine how many taxi licenses are issued each year, which means there are 886 taxis in the city.  

 

Now, a group of independent taxi drivers is asking the city to remove that cap.  

 


Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute in San Antonio are using a type of primate to help prevent birth defects caused by the Zika virus.


Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio International Airport received 1.9 inches of snow Thursday night, while other parts of Bexar County saw up to 2.5 inches.

 

That’s the largest amount of snow to have fallen in the Alamo city area in more than 30 years.

 

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