Joey Palacios

News Reporter

Born and raised in San Antonio, Joey joined the Texas Public Radio newsroom in October of 2011. Joey graduated from Roosevelt High School and obtained an A.A.S in Radio-Television-Broadcasting from San Antonio College in 2010.

Joey started his broadcasting career  in 2007 at KSYM-90.1 FM as a DJ and later became Program Director of the station. After graduation, he interned at  KTSA-550 AM and was hired as a reporter covering elections, breaking news, and the 2011 legislative session.

For TPR, Joey covers a variety of general assignments including: breaking news, local school districts, higher education, police, fire, capital improvement, non-profits, health care, community issues and local politics. Joey has also had several stories aired on NPR national newscasts.

When not working, Joey enjoys biking, hiking, cooking, and socializing.

Ways To Connect

  The campaign headquarters of former state senator Leticia Van de Putte vibrated with wild cheering shortly after the polls closed at 7 p.m.  The early vote showed Van de Putte leading a field of 14 candidates running for San Antonio mayor, and she remained in first place throughout the evening as Election Day tallies rolled in.

City of San Antonio

It’s usually difficult to unseat incumbent candidates. But San Antonio District 7 Councilmember Cris Medina’s seat might be in jeopardy. Here’s more on the embattled councilman’s race to keep his seat and why things are tough for him.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

A lot of Bexar County property owners say they're in shock after getting their property appraisals in the mail this week. The values of area homes are going up, which, in turn, means higher taxes are on the way. If someone isn’t planning on selling their home, they aren’t going to be happy.

Chris Eudaily / TPR News

How much should City Council members and the mayor be paid? That’s one of the issues on the ballot as early voting continues in San Antonio’s local elections. We decided to size up the issue by talking to voters and a former mayor who knows what it takes to be an effective city official.

San Antonio council members do not currently earn a salary. They’re paid $20 for each meeting they attend, or about $1000 per year. The mayor receives a little more per meeting, earning a maximum of $4,000 a year.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The migration of minor children from Central America into the United States is one of the most painful problems facing us, as a community, said a leading advisor to Pope Francis, who is supposed to visit the U.S. Capitol in September and is expected to talk to lawmakers about a number of issues. Cardinal Oscar Rodriguez Maradiaga of the Honduras visited San Antonio this week and talked about what Central American children were going through.

The influx of minor children from the Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala is a migration issue the cardinal holds close to heart. He is Archbishop of Tegucigalpa, the capital of the Honduras.

Cardinal Maradiaga said he believed drug lords organized the migration to divert attention from their activities. “I am convinced this was organized by the drug lords. They were paying coyotes in order to move so many children at once, in order to attract [attention] to this problem and to leave other places free for their traffic.”

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