Norma Martinez

News Anchor

Norma Martinez is a native of El Paso and a veteran of public broadcasting. She began volunteering at the El Paso public radio station KTEP as a college student in 1989. She spent a year as a Morning Edition host and reporter at KRWG-FM in Las Cruces, New Mexico, before returning to KTEP as a full-time employee in 1995. At KTEP, Norma served as Morning Edition host, chief announcer, Traffic Director, PSA Director, and host and producer of various local shows.

Norma also voiced numerous commercials and worked part-time as a DJ at country, adult contemporary, and classic rock stations in El Paso.

Norma is a 1993 graduate of the University of Texas at El Paso, earning a BA in Music Performance. She spent 23 years as a cellist with the El Paso Symphony Orchestra.

Ways to Connect

Public Domain

This week on Fronteras. 

  •   South Texans say the president’s border wall is affecting them before it’s even built.
  • San Antonians demonstrate for and against removing a Confederate monument from a downtown park.
  • Listening helps foster racial understanding in Austin.
  • Truck driver indicted in human smuggling deaths.
  • Texas Gulf coast residents sue a large plastics plant saying it’s polluting their water.
  • A look at cultural rituals and myths attached to the celestial phenomenon of a solar eclipse.

 

Griffith Observatory

Monday’s North American solar eclipse is enthralling skywatchers nationwide. It’s the first eclipse to span the country coast-to-coast since 1918.  People are traveling from all over the world to the sites of totality.  But, centuries ago, a solar eclipse was seen as a bad omen in cultures around the world.

Norma Martinez

On Fronteras:  

  • The importance of including accurate Mexican-American history in school curriculums.
  • An Austin bar shuts down a Latino DJ group for playing Latin music.
  • Two North Texas artists are working to beautify the image many people have about life on the Texas/Mexico border.   

Norma Martinez

In 2010, public schools in Arizona were forbidden from teaching Mexican American studies to their students.  A group of Republican state lawmakers there argued that the classes created resentments towards other races, and even in some cases, promoted the overthrow of the U.S. government.  A U.S. District Court judge is expected to rule on the ban’s constitutionality in the coming days.

Educators in Texas are looking past the Arizona controversy and are working to teach public school students about Hispanics’ often-overlooked role in shaping American history. 

Texas Public Radio’s Norma Martinez sat down with Marco Cervantes, director of the Mexican American Studies Program at the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Lilliana Saldaña, Associate Professor in Bicultural-Bilingual Studies at the UTSA College of Education and Human Development.

Wikimedia Commons

The City of San Antonio is reporting the following street closures as of 10am Tuesday, August 8, due to flooding from Monday's storms.

  • Devine between Dick Friedrich & Alamo Heights
  • George Rd between NW Military & Lockhill-Selma
  • Mauermann between Applewhite & Pleasanton
  • Gibbs Sprawl between Rittiman & Kerby Limits
  • Old Grissom Rd between Grissom & Culebra
  • Old Seguin between Binz Engleman & I-35

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