Paul Flahive

Technology & Entrepreneurship Reporter; Creator of Worth Repeating

Paul Flahive is the Technology & Entrepreneurship Reporter for Texas Public Radio. He has worked in public media across the country from Iowa City to Chicago to Anchorage then here in San Antonio. 

As producer of "The Source," Paul was honored with two 2015 Lone Star Awards from the Houston Press Club, one for Best Talk Program and the other for Best Public Affairs Segment. In 2016 he was honored with an Anson Jones Award from the Texas Medical Association for a story he did on community clinics.

Paul is also a co-host and creator of TPR's live storytelling program, Worth Repeating.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Technology and Entrepreneurship News Fund including The 80/20 Foundation, Group 42, rackspace, The Elmendorf Family Fund, UTSA Center for Innovation, Technology and Entrepreneurship, Denim Group, SecureLogix, VentureLab, Conceptual MindWorks, Inc., and Giles-Parscale.

Ways to Connect

It's loud in the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. All weekend, thousands of teachers have been streaming in for the annual International Society for Technology in Education conference. They expect more than 15,000 educators over the multi-day event. 

Since early Sunday morning, companies have been building out their rooms, or building up their booths on the convention center floor.

Courtesy of Dauber Applications

Dauber Applications is a company trying to reinvent how one part of the construction industry works: dump trucks. 

Imagine you are a foreman, and you have lined up work for the next day with a team of guys you are paying $500 an hour to load trucks. 

"The scariest, gut-wrenching part is to not have a truck ready at that time," says Dauber CEO Brian Jones. "Right now the way you try to solve that is you call the trucking company and beg, plead, yell and do other unpleasant things to find out where is your truck."

Courtesy of ATS

Uptane, the cyber security software developed by New York University, Southwest Research Institute, and the University of Michigan, is making inroads into the global automotive supply chain. 

Google

Nearly 5 months ago, the city asked Google Fiber to stop building a network of telecommunications hubs in San Antonio after complaints surrounding the first one in Haskin Park.  Mayor Ivy Taylor raised concerns about the Google's use of parks and the hut proximity to homes. Subsequently, city staff recommended the relocation of eight huts, nearly half of the planned network. 

Software bugs are expensive. One estimate said it cost the U.S. economy $60 billion a year, and that was 14 years ago. 

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