Paul Flahive

Producer - "The Source"

Paul Flahive is the producer for Texas Public Radio's live, call-in show, "The Source." He has worked in public radio on and off since he before graduating from the University of Iowa with a degree in journalism and political science. While there he worked for the local public radio station, WSUI/KSUI, as a production assistant on their show "Talk of Iowa" as well as a reporter for weekend programs. 

Flahive's love of the audio feature led him east to work for the Third Coast International Audio Festival as an assistant, which was at the time a part of Chicago Public Radio. From there he moved to Alaska to run a journalism-based, after-school program for teenagers called the Alaska Teen Media Institute. Taking a break from full-time journalism, he ran an outreach program for homeless, at-risk youth and victims of human trafficking for Covenant House Alaska. A quick tour as show runner for the live show Arctic Entries led him back to radio.

He is an avid runner (though don't ask him what his marathon times are because he doesn't want to talk about them), and loves Graham Greene characters more than he loves most people. 

Ways To Connect

  When the Department of Education started investigating Corinthian Colleges, one of the biggest for-profit college chains in the country, they were following a chain of student stories of fraud and exploitation. 

Low-income students fell prey to big promises from Corinthian and other for-profit schools who were seeking access to big federal dollars through the federal student-loan program, also known as FAFSA. 

When the feds turned off the tap last year, Corinthian lost access to hundreds of millions of dollars and as of early May has filed for bankruptcy protection. 

City of San Antonio / cc

As the city of San Antonio examines whether or not to annex the largest swath of land in decades, many are pushing back against the city practice. Several bills have been filed in the 84th Legislature to make it more difficult to grab up unincorporated areas.

The bills have failed to muster much support with nearly all of them dying in committee, but the number of bills filed gives an indication of how unpopular annexation is to several Texas communities.

Big changes may be coming to downtown. The first skyscraper in 25 years, a new high-end development that would remove the blighted Solo Serve building, and a Houston Street that is making a comeback are all bringing life to an area that has served as a thoroughfare for tourists heading from San Fernando Cathedral to the Alamo. 

Will San Antonio see the downtown renewal that is has dreamed about for so long?

Guests:

Catholic Charities

The state climatologist, John Nielsen-Gammon, says we are close to the end of this historic drought. While rain and fog currently drench the area, how can urban farmers and small gardens take advantage of the sudden water abundance?  We talk with David Rodriguez from the Texas A&M Agrilife Extension to find out what challenges a wet spring might bring

Guest:

  • David Rodriguez, Extension Horticulturalist for Bexar County's Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service

Culinaria begins tomorrow, and the festival with the aim of promoting San Antonio's food and wine scene has much to celebrate. World class chefs, new restaurants and a faithful foodie class are all growing in the barbeque and taco centric town. Where are we going, and what can we expect?

Guests:

  • Edmund Tijerina, Food and Dining writer at the San Antonio Express-News
  • John Russ, Executive Chef at Luke Restaurant
  • Angela Covo, Editor of Edible San Antonio

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