Ron Moore

Classical Music Host

Ron has always lived in two musical worlds: jazz and classical. Although born in Los Angeles, he has lived in San Antonio most of his life.

Hearing jazz while growing up at home, Ron discovered classical music as a child at the San Antonio Public Library; his favorite composers have always been Miles Davis and Brahms.

Ron has bought, sold, or broadcast music for a living for most of his adult life, all while writing novels, plays and essays on the side. Prior to joining TPR, Ron worked at Doubleday in New York and Sound Warehouse in San Antonio.

His enthusiasm for music has been captured forever on the "Ruff-Mitchell Duo Play With Dizzy Gillespie" - the screams that endlessly repeat in the background are his.

Ron currently lives in Boston.

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2013 marks the 100th anniversary of the first performance of Igor Stravinsky's landmark ballet "Le Sacre du Printemps," commonly known as "The Rite of Spring."

James Baker and Ron Moore, for many years co-hosts of KPAC's Alternate Routes, recently took time out to reflect on the meaning of 100 years of The Rite of Spring.

There are essentially two versions of Igor Stravinsky's Rite of Spring.

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Wagner's incredible and improbable success is one of the fairytale's of high art. The late Jacques Barzun referred to his position in later life as: "That of a Lord of all the arts."

Randy Anderson has rightly commented on his association with the highest circles of the intellect and art: De Gobineau, Nietzsche, Semper, Meyerbeer, Berlioz and later Liszt, as Wagner would wed Cosima, the pianist's daughter.

So how did all this happen?

Ken Howard / Metropolitan Opera

The 2012-13 opera season has come and almost gone. For whatever wonders summer may hold, the Met Opera season of broadcasts closes this weekend with the living end, Richard Wagner's "Götterdämmerung."

In a staggering marathon of recapitulations, developments, plot changes and reversals, and a grand procession of leitmotivs that ignite a conflagration that ends the opera, the gods and the world are reborn in the cleansing fires of the overflowing Rhine.

But how does it all happen?

Metropolitan Opera

I have recently been reading about the post World War II international attempts to restore Europe, both materially and spiritually.

This struggle for renewal after suffering and oppression is given a musical shape in Francis Poulenc's, "Dialogues des Carmélites." Though premiered in 1956, its origins are in the period directly after the war in 1947-49.

Ken Howard / Metropolitan Opera

If you're older than thirty you may know something of the unlikely and extremely rare probability of a baroque opera being performed at the Metropolitan Opera. This was sometime in the late eighties, but in musical terms seems a lifetime ago.

To quote Inspector Morse, the opera loving sleuth, "I was horrified to discover that the tickets I had received for Wagner were in fact for Handel!"

I can think of no opera composer of the first rank who has undergone so radical a transformation of fortune as Handel.

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