Ryan Poppe

News Reporter - Capitol

Ryan started his radio career in 2002 working for Austin’s News Radio KLBJ-AM as a show producer for the station's organic gardening shows. This slowly evolved into a role as the morning show producer and later as the group’s executive producer.

Eventually converting into an on-air reporter, Ryan has covered topics ranging from crime to the political process at the state capitol.

Ryan and his wife Mary own a home in Leander. He enjoys spending time at many of areas parks and outdoor spots with his son Luke and listening to live music at some of Austin jazz and reggae hotspots.  

Ryan is the cook in the family and it is understood that the kitchen is his territory. His favorite menu items range from Jamaican to North African fare to modern Thai-cuisine.

Ways to Connect

David Martin Davies

 

To secede or not to secede?  That’s the question leaders of the Texas Nationalist Movement have for state elected officials following the United Kingdom’s narrow vote to leave the European Union.  While the fringe issue has become more of a mainstream conversation, state party leaders from both sides of the political aisle are still very much against the idea.

 

 

Justices on the U.S. Supreme Court in a narrow decision on Thursday decided that UT-Austin’s “use of race” in deciding its college admissions was constitutional.  It's a ruling that will forever impact the lives of prospective college students and the future of college admissions policies.

Ryan E. Poppe

Ahead of the 2017 Legislative session, lawmakers are looking at ways to boost college enrollment for working adults like military veterans, reaching those non-traditional students was discussed at the state capitol Tuesday.

The number of college students who also work has declined in recent years.  According to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, currently 39 percent of the state’s 3.8 million college students work full or part-time jobs while attending classes.

Rep. Lyle Larson

A handful of lawmakers at the state capitol are outraged by the latest regulations adopted by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission. The new rules are aimed at controlling the spread of Chronic Wasting Disease among the Texas deer population.

Following the passage of the updated regulations, Rep. Lyle Larson, a Republican from San Antonio sent out a tweet that chastised Parks and Wildlife officials for violating private property owner’s rights.

Ryan E. Poppe

Last summer Texas Parks and Wildlife officials began working on state regulations for testing the state’s deer population for chronic wasting disease, an illness that can wipe out entire herds of deer at a time.  One year later,the disease is still being detected and the state has devised new plans that aren’t sitting well with deer breeders and captive deer ranchers.

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