Ryan Poppe

News Reporter - Capitol

Ryan started his radio career in 2002 working for Austin’s News Radio KLBJ-AM as a show producer for the station's organic gardening shows. This slowly evolved into a role as the morning show producer and later as the group’s executive producer.

Eventually converting into an on-air reporter, Ryan has covered topics ranging from crime to the political process at the state capitol.

Ryan and his wife Mary own a home in Leander. He enjoys spending time at many of areas parks and outdoor spots with his son Luke and listening to live music at some of Austin jazz and reggae hotspots.  

Ryan is the cook in the family and it is understood that the kitchen is his territory. His favorite menu items range from Jamaican to North African fare to modern Thai-cuisine.

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Ryan Poppe

It might be hard to believe, but Texas’s voting maps, those lines that decide where your representative district is and what seat you’re voting for, have been in flux for the past six years.

Large swaths of the state from Dallas to San Antonio out towards El Paso have had their congressional and state House districts disputed since 2011.  That’s when the state’s Republican-led legislature re-drew the maps. The Texas Constitution requires the state legislature re-draw these districts after each census, to make sure these geographic boundaries contain the same amount of people.

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

Lawmakers in the Texas Senate have taken up a bill that would allow judges and county clerks to deny marriages to same-sex couples based on their religious beliefs.  Opponents question whether the bill, if enacted, would violate a person’s constitutional rights and whose rights would they be violating?

The bill by State Senator Brian Birdwell, a Granbury Republican, would exempt county clerks from having to draw up a marriage license for a same-sex couple and county judges from performing them, if doing so violated their own religious beliefs.

Ryan Poppe / Texas Public Radio

An amendment to the House version of the state budget won overwhelming support to ban the use of state funds on a private schools school choice program.  House members voted 103 to 44 in favor of the ban.

The budget covers general state spending on issues ranging from public education to how much money will go towards maintaining Texas roads.  Then there are amendments, some of which are meant to show where the House as a body stands on certain issues.

 

A panel of federal judges in San Antonio has set April 27 for the latest hearing on Texas’ Congressional redistricting maps.

In March, federal judges ruled that the boundaries for three congressional maps drawn by the Legislature in 2011 were meant to discriminate against Latino and African-American voters.  Those districts at issue include seats currently help by Rep. Lloyd Doggett who represents an area from Austin to San Antonio, and the district represented by Rep. Will Hurd.  It stretches from San Antonio southwest to the border.
 

Ryan Poppe / TPR News

The Texas Senate has passed a proposed state budget, now it’s the House’s turn.  Beginning Thursday morning lawmakers will begin debating what the state should pay for over the next two years. Lawmakers may also try to slim in some items that have nothing to do with spending.

 

 

  

The House’s chief budget writer John Zerwas says the House version of the budget focuses heavily on the needs of Texas children.

 

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