Texas Water Symposium

Water, essential for life, is our most precious and valuable natural resource, but water supply is limited and under increasing pressure from a growing population.  How will we protect this resource and plan for a sustainable future?  There is a great need for a water-literate public; decisions being made today have far reaching and long lasting effects for our children and future generations.

The Texas Water Symposium series provides perspectives from policy makers, scientists, water resource experts and regional leaders.  Join us as we explore together, the complexity and challenges in providing water for Texans in this century.  Each session is free and open to the public.

The Texas Water Symposium is presented through a partnership with the Hill Country Alliance, Schreiner University, Texas Tech University and Texas Public Radio.

Paul Huchton Photography / http://paulhuchtonphotography.com

“God just gave us so much water. We can't make it, it's just there. But we’re making more people.” Such as it was plainly stated by Mike Bira at the latest Texas Water Symposium, held on February 23, 2017 on the campus of Texas State University in San Marcos. The panel discussion focused on watershed protection programs at a city and community level.

AgriLife Today http://bit.ly/1rFzmHP / cc

The legal challenges that come with private property rights and Texas’ growing need for water were the topic of the most recent Texas Water Symposium, held on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin.

Flickr: Shannon https://flic.kr/p/duo8ut / CC

They may be small, but micro flora and fauna play a significant role in the ecosystem of Texas waterways. At the Texas Water Symposium on Thursday, September 1 in Kerrville, a panel of educators, researchers and ecologists shared their insights on the impact of human development on these small creatures, and explained their role in keeping our rivers and streams healthy.

In the audio, you’ll learn in detail:

Nathan Cone / TPR

“If you can’t cook ‘em, eat ‘em, or shoot ‘em, what the heck good are they?” was the subtext of a panel discussion held on the campus of Texas Tech University-Junction on May 18, 2016. The Golden-cheeked Warbler, several species of mussels, and Monarch butterflies were all brought up in the context of conservation and concerns over development in the Texas Hill Country.

Nathan Cone / TPR

Whether the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer can meet the needs of a growing population in Texas was the question of the night at the Texas Water Symposium held on February 11, 2016 on the Texas State University campus in San Marcos. Texas State’s Geography Department, the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment, and the Hill Country Alliance brought a group of aquifer scientists together to explore the topic.

Pages