Wendy Rigby

Bioscience and Medicine Reporter

Wendy Rigby is a San Antonio native who has worked as a journalist for more than 25 years. She spent two decades at KENS-TV covering health and medical news. Now, she brings her considerable background, experience and passion to Texas Public Radio.

Wendy has earned dozens of awards for medical reporting from various state and national organizations including the Texas Medical Association, the American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, and the Dallas Press Club. She has been honored with two Emmy Awards from the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.

Wendy earned her Bachelor’s degree in Print and Broadcast Journalism from Trinity University in San Antonio. She graduated summa cum laude.

She lives in San Antonio with her husband. Wendy has two adult children and a menagerie of pets. She enjoys music, reading, watching movies, cross-stitching and travel.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the BioScience and Medicine News Desk including  Xenex Disinfection Services, The John and Rita Feik Foundation, The John and Susan Kerr Charitable Foundation, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Jean Cheever and San Antonio Technology Center.  Additional support comes from Cappy and Suzy Lawton and InCube Labs.

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

***This story was updated at 4:00 p.m.

 

Brooke Army Medical Center is reporting two employees have been confirmed with Legionnaires’ disease, and a third is awaiting test results. The cases do not involve hospital patients, but workers on post.

Maryland Department of Health

President Donald Trump’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis is urging him to declare the nation’s opioid epidemic a national emergency. Tuesday, Trump was briefed on the drug problem that’s killing a hundred Americans every day. Meanwhile, a new city-county Opioid Task Force met for the first time in San Antonio.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

Treating American service members hurt in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts created a new military emphasis on polytrauma -- a medical term meaning more than one serious injury. The complex wounds of war also created a need for a new model of care that today is helping veterans and active duty military heal.

Texas Infectious Disease Readiness

August is part of peak mosquito season here in Texas. Those pesky insects do a lot more than just create itchy bumps. They carry some serious diseases. Now, Texans have a website created just for them to keep up with news about emerging health threats. In today’s TPR Lifeline, Bioscience-Medicine reporter Wendy Rigby talks with infectious disease specialist Jan Patterson, MD, of UT Health San Antonio.

UT Health San Antonio Research Imaging Center

Each year in the U.S., as many as 3,000 children drown in water.  About two-thirds of them are resuscitated, but the brain damage is usually devastating.

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