FRONTERAS: U.S. Policy To Slow Migration Threatened; DREAMer Deferred; Conjunto Queen Eva Ybarra

Nov 3, 2017

This week on Fronteras: 

  • Corruption in Guatemala threatens to derail U.S. efforts to discourage migration – efforts that citizens support.  [0:00]
  • San Antonio prepares arguments against SB4 for appeals court.  [5:09]
  • The story of a Houston Dreamer finding it hard to dream while coping with the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey and the end of DACA.  [6:30]
  • Why the work of an American artist is on display at a museum in Tijuana for the first time in 15 years. [11:25]
  • A look into the life of conjunto accordion queen Eva Ybarra.  [15:35]


 

Guatemalan citizens carry an empty coffin in front of Guatemala’s National Palace. The coffin symbolizes what demonstrators called the death of democracy following their president’s attempt to expel the head of CICIG
Credit Gabriel Wer

Guatemala Corruption Threatens U.S. Policy Aimed To Slow Migration

A U.S. policy goal is under threat in Guatemala.  It’s designed to keep Central Americans off the migrant trail through Mexico to America. This Central American policy goal is strengthening institutions like government, the courts and police. The idea is to help countries function better so that people won't want to leave home looking for a better life in the U.S. 

But in Guatemala, that goal is now in jeopardy.  A UN-led commission is prosecuting corruption that's crippled the economy for the vast majority of Guatemalans for generations. Today that country’s economy depends on international loans and investment. But that money is tied to progress against corruption—-which Guatemala's president is trying to diffuse. The story from Lorne Matalon in Guatemala City.

San Antonio Prepares Arguments Against SB4

The lawsuit against the sanctuary cities ban known as SB4 is back in court next week.  Plaintiff attorneys for the City of San Antonio and Bexar County, who have sued the state, previewed the arguments Tuesday.  Texas Public Radio’s Ryan Poppe reports they will make their case before the US 5th Circuit Court in New Orleans.

Maritza, a senior at Furr High School in Houston, works in her college prep class, where students research and apply to universities. Harvey flooded her home and delayed the start of school, causing her to miss a DACA application deadline.
Credit Michael Stravato

Houston Dreamer Hit Hard By Harvey And DACA Decision

Houston finally has something to celebrate in the days since Hurricane Harvey.  The Astros won the World Series for the first time.  But not everyone is finding it easy to smile. In the storm-plagued city, an estimated one in ten students is a Dreamer.  That adds up to 20,000 students.  Houston Public Media's Laura Isensee has the story of one teenager whose dream got deferred following two incidents:  Hurricane Harvey and President Trump’s decision to phase out DACA, the Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals program.

"The Flame," a painting by San Diego artist Mark Bryce, features an Uncle Sam hat sitting on a blue box with a dimly lit candle in the foreground.
Credit Mark Bryce

Tijuana Museum Showcases American Artist

The Centro Cultural de Tijuana recently opened its first exhibition of an American artist in more than a decade, part of an effort to stimulate more cross-border cultural exchange in a turbulent time for U.S.-Mexico relations.

The exhibit features 23 paintings by San Diego-based artist Mark Bryce.  It coincides with the museum’s celebration of its 35th anniversary.  Andrew Bowen of KPBS was there as the artwork went up.

Conjunto accordionist and bandleader Eva Ybarra, second from left, performs at the 2017 National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellowships Concert. Also pictured: Joe Perez, Pedro Lopez, Sandy Rodriguez and Richard Perez.
Credit Tom Pich

Conjunto Accordion Queen Eva Ybarra

In the late 1940s, a proud father put a small accordion into the hands of his determined 4-year-old daughter. Little Eva Ybarra doggedly persevered against the naysayers, who told her a female accordionist would never make it — and she rose to conjunto royalty. Now, she’s considered the “queen of the accordion.”

Norma Martinez can be reached at norma@tpr.org or on Twitter @NormDog1