The Impact Of Invasive Species On Texas Water Resources

May 3, 2017

Invasive Arundo cane, Zebra Mussels, and Hydrilla are among a host of aquatic plants and animals that are not native to Texas and compete with our native animals and plants for food and space. Because introduced species lack natural enemies in our waterways, they can multiply and spread at an alarming rate, interfering with boat traffic, affecting water quality and quantity, and causing a range of other problems. 

Recorded at the Texas Water Symposium on April 27, Tim Birdsong, aquatic biologist and Ecosystem/Habitat Assessment Chief of Inland Fisheries for Texas Parks and Wildlife moderates a panel of invasive species specialists in a discussion of invasives in the Hill Country, their potential costs to native wildlife and infrastructure, approaching threats, and the most effective ways for the Hill Country to protect our waterways. 

The Texas Water Symposium is a joint presentation of Texas Public Radio, the Hill Country Alliance, Schreiner University, and Texas Tech University.

 

Moderator: Tim Birdsong, Ecosystem/Habitat Assessment Chief of Inland Fisheries for Texas Parks and Wildlife Panelists:

  • Dr. Tom Arsuffi, Director of the Llano River Field Station at Texas Tech University – Junction
  • Bob Howells, Retired TPWD: Author of Freshwater Mussels of Texas
  • Rachael Ranft, Director of Northern Hill Country River Projects, The Nature Conservancy

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