Education Achievement
2:26 pm
Wed December 12, 2012

Local School Districts Vs. The World

The Global Report Card compares school district performance in the United States to international students from other developed countries around the world. The tool also allows you to see demographic information that helps tell a more complete story of each district.

"The score represents the percentage of students in the international group who would have a lower level of achievement. For example, a percentile of 60 means the average student in a school district would perform better than 60% of the students in the international group."

Alamo Heights ISD

The average student in Alamo Heights ISD would perform better than 58 percent of international students in Math and 70 percent in reading.

Alamo Heights has a total of 4,660 students, with 17 percent of students receiving free or reduced lunches, and a minority population of 38 percent.

San Antonio ISD

The average student at San Antonio ISD would perform better than 40 percent of international students in reading and 35 percent in math.

SAISD has a total of 54,696 students with 55 percent receiving free or reduced price lunches and a minority population of 97 percent.

What does this all mean?

This means that public school education in the U.S. has a long way to go to catch up to other developed countries, and this interactive graphic is a handy tool to see where exactly schools stack up.

The George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas conducted the study -- which is in its second year -- as part of the organization's education reform initiative. The Presidential Center was created to act as the forum for public service for the former president and his wife.

The No Child Left Behind Act, which placed a greater emphasis on standardized tests to monitor district progress and has been the subject of heated educational debate, was the Bush administrations' biggest piece of education reform.

In some ways this study measures the effect of those policies.