Fronteras Desk
2:00 pm
Fri January 24, 2014

Same-Sex Couples Challenging Arizona Marriage Laws

Fronteras: It's been 150 years since the U.S. Army forced the Navajo and Mescalero Apache to walk 400 miles to a prison camp in eastern New Mexico in an attempt to wipe out their culture. "The Long Walk's"  impacts are still felt today. Supporters of same-sex marriage have seen recent victories in the past few weeks. Now some Arizona couples are pushing for change. Also, a climatologist gives us the latest drought picture across the Southwest.

Arizona Same-Sex Couples Challenge State Laws

Across the country the legal landscape for same-sex marriage is changing, and fast. In the Southwest in recent weeks, courts in New Mexico and Utah have delivered victories to gay marriage proponents. Now in neighboring Arizona, some gay and lesbian couples are challenging their state’s definition of marriage. From the Fronteras Desk in Phoenix, Jude Joffe-Block reports.

Impact Of The Long Walk Still Felt 150 Years Later

This month marks the 150th anniversary of what Navajo and Mescalero Apache people call "The Long Walk" -- similar to the forced march known as the "Trail Of Tears." In 1864 the U.S. Army forced the Navajo and Apache to walk 400 miles from their reservation in northeastern Arizona to the edge of the Pecos River in eastern New Mexico -- thousands died. From the Changing America Desk in Flagstaff, Laurel Morales reports.

Solar Parasols: What are They and Where are They Made?

Solar parasols are part of a new sustainability initiative for Parisian outdoor cafes.  The environmentally-friendly heaters and air filters are being supplied by a futuristic design company based in Tijuana and San Diego called Amorphica.   Brooke Binkowski has more from Tijuana.

Southwest States Receive Low Grades For Tobacco Control Efforts

New Mexico received the highest grade in the nation for its spending on efforts to curb smoking according to a new report. But as Tristan Ahtone reports, states in the Southwest generally received poor to failing grades in regards to tobacco prevention.

New DHS Secretary Tours Border, Addresses Transparency Issues

Newly confirmed Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson recently spent time traveling in the border patrol’s busiest regions, South Texas and Southern Arizona. Michel Marizco reports on the secretary’s first trip to the border.

New Report on Western Drought

The latest report from the U.S. Drought Monitor warned western states cannot expect any relief from the ongoing drought. The dry spell will further strain the region's water supply. Climatologist Brian Fuchs, with the National Drought Mitigation Center in Nebraska, talks about the report with TPR’s Crystal Chavez.

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