Fronteras

Fridays at 3 p.m., Saturdays at 6 a.m., and Sundays at 9 p.m.

Fronteras is a collaborative regional news project that explores the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Central Texas to Southern California, and from Las Vegas to the Mexican border, Fronteras brings emphasis to Latino and Native American life and border issues affecting American politics, social order, economics and the environmental landscape.

Lorne Matalon / Marfa Public Radio

This week on Fronteras:    

  •  A high profile anti-U.S.-Mexico pipeline campaign gets underway as the builder is ordered to pay border landowners millions.
  • If you need a passport, it may take a while to get – there’s a backlog.
  • A border school helps students of immigrants bypass college tuition and earn two years of college credits before getting their high school diploma.
  • Honoring World Refugee Day with the success story of an Iraqi refugee who fled death and now helps other immigrants market their skills for American  jobs.

   

Texas Landowners Win Millions As Stars Launch Anti-Pipeline Campaign

In Texas, they say energy is king.  It may still be but right now the crown belongs to West Texas landowners. They just won unexpectedly high awards - millions of dollars  -against Energy Transfer, a U.S. company contracted by Mexico to build a controversial natural gas pipeline. Mexico is paying for the pipeline that will carry Texas natural gas to Mexican power plants. And because the state says the pipeline is in the public interest, that gives the builder the power to seize private land here.  Despite winning lucrative awards for the pipeline being built on their property, the landowners really don’t want it and they’re getting some huge help.  A high profile anti-pipeline campaign is underway – fueled by the power of Hollywood. The story from Marfa Public Radio’s Fronteras reporter Lorne Matalon.The Story 

David Martin Davies / TPR News

This week on Fronteras:

·      Central Americans Crossing Border, Overwhelming Texas Shelters

·         NAFTA Supporters Say The Trade Agreement Has Benefited Economies

·         Texas Flood Survivors Still Rebuilding One Year Later 

·         Golf Helps Students Score In School

Central Americans Crossing Border, Overwhelming Texas Shelters

David Wright / KUNM

This week on Fronteras:

·         Some evidence that New Mexico state workers may have falsified applications for emergency food stamps. 

·         A five-state survey shows many Americans in the Southwest feel financially squeezed by the costs of healthcare.

·         In Dallas, a program is helping low income families learn vital parenting skills.

·         A new Austin development raises concern because it’s next to an ancestral cemetery housing graves of the enslaved.

·         An artist travels along the Old Spanish Trail for a new exhibit at Albuquerque’s National Hispanic Cultural Center.

Ed Williams / KUNM

·         This week on Fronteras:  Texas is a popular relocation area for refugees but the agencies that resettle them may lose their federal funding. 

Bexar County

This week on Fronteras:  

·         A federal lawsuit against the border city of El Paso aims to stop the city from jailing poor traffic offenders who can’t pay their fines.

·         Dallas police test the new sponge gun- an alternative to shooting suspects with bullets.

·         Racial slur incident at Texas A&M sparks a teaching symposium

·         In San Diego, homeless children of immigrants may not get the help they need to stay in school.

·         A new exhibit shows how the Spanish colonized Bexar County centuries ago. 

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