Fronteras

Fridays at 3 p.m., Saturdays at 6 a.m., and Sundays at 9 p.m.

Fronteras is a collaborative regional news project that explores the changing culture and demographics of the American Southwest. From Central Texas to Southern California, and from Las Vegas to the Mexican border, Fronteras brings emphasis to Latino and Native American life and border issues affecting American politics, social order, economics and the environmental landscape.

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Fronteras
1:21 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

Fronteras: San Diego Marijuana Business, Chinese Students Leave Home For TX, & South TX Holiday Food

Nearly 132,000 pounds of marijuana were seized in the San Diego area during 2014.
DEA

On Fronteras:

- Law enforcement in San Diego County say the marijuana business is putting children in danger. But marijuana advocates say officers are being alarmist.

-What is it like for international students who leave everything behind in search of a good education in the U.S.? We hear from Chinese students who are new to Texas.

- The Border Patrol is looking for a few good women. The Border Patrol has completed its first recruitment drive directed at women.

-Fronteras Commentator Yvette Benavides talks about her favorite Mexican-American foods this time of year. Warning: This story could cause severe cravings!

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Fronteras
4:12 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

Mexico’s Soda Tax; Dual-Language In N. Texas; Where The Immigrant Children Went

A patient waits to see a doctor at a clinic in Tijuana, Nov. 7, 2014.
Katie Schoolov

On Fronteras:

-- While recent studies have shown that the brain is not an immutable object and can learn and relearn skills post a critical childhood window, there is no doubt that a conducive environment and starting young profoundly impacts a person’s ability to learn, think and process information. This includes language. Educators in Grand Prairie in North Texas talk about the district’s growing dual language program.

-- There’s been plenty of talk of trying to regulate sodas and other sugary drinks to combat obesity. Mexico has already been taxing sugary drinks for almost a year now, and the tax seems to be producing positive results.

-- We now have a better idea of where the Central American minors who came to the U.S. alone earlier this year in droves, ended up. Pew Research Center gives us an update.

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Fronteras
2:19 pm
Fri December 5, 2014

Case to Determine if Landowners Can Export Water; Republicans Contest President’s Immigration Action

Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez fools around with her friend, Claudio Taffer, before going inside the StoryCorps MobileBooth.
Doualy Xaykaothao KERA News

On Fronteras:

-- Can local ranchers and farmers export water from under their land, especially to Mexico, at a time when the U.S. suffers through some of its driest times ever? We look at a water rights case in Texas.
-- State Republican leaders are gearing up to battle President Obama’s executive order on immigration in a variety of ways, beginning with a lawsuit challenging the legality of the action, by Attorney General Gregg Abbott.
-- Groups in San Antonio are trying to help people make sense of the President’s immigration orders. They’re also trying to ensure people don’t become victims of immigration fraud.
-The popular StoryCorps MobileBooth is in Dallas. Dallas County Sheriff, Lupe Valdez, shares the story of her first election, and how she felt she had to beat the odds to win.

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Fronteras
2:20 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

UTSA Student On Being “DACAmented”

UTSA junior Diego Mancha
Crystal Chavez

On Fronteras:

-- Diego Mancha is a UT San Antonio student. His mother brought him to this country illegally as a child. About two years ago, Diego was granted Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals — or DACA — status. He says it changed his life. We’ll hear his story.

-- We’ll also meet a North Texas high school student from Guatemala, who’s juggling school and work. It’s worth it all to her, as she’s getting a fresh start after escaping violence back home.

-- Also, Fronteras commentator Yvette Benavides shares childhood memories of Thanksgiving Day. She tells us about the interesting way her father scored the family table’s centerpiece.

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Fronteras
2:09 pm
Fri November 21, 2014

Executive Action On Immigration, Mexican Murders, And A "Richest-Poor" Neighborhood on Fronteras

A child peers through a window facing a City Heights alley, Oct. 21, 2014
Katie Schoolov

On Fronteras:

-- President Obama has kept his promise. He took executive action on the nation’s immigration laws. We get reaction from San Antonio, Texas.

-- Anguish is mounting over the Mexican government’s response to the collective murders of 43 college students. The protests aren’t letting up and there’s a sense that this incident has started a movement that is going to stick.

-- We’ll hear how one school district in north Texas is educating a growing number of immigrant children, whose primary language isn’t English.

-City Heights could be San Diego’s “richest-poor” neighborhood. There’s been decades of philanthropic investment there. Two foundations have spent more than a quarter of a billion dollars in City Heights since 2000. So what's become of all that money? Are its residents better off?

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Fronteras
2:58 pm
Fri November 14, 2014

Texas Lawsuit Against U.S. Border Patrol Could Set Precedent

Cindy Cornett Seigle via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

On Fronteras:

  • We meet a Dallas public high school student from the Democratic Republic of Congo. He tells us about the challenges of fitting in at school here.
  • If a lawsuit against the Border Patrol moves forward, individual agents could be sued over their actions during so called "roving patrol" stops. A Texas case against the Border Patrol may set an important precedent. We have the details.
  • Also, Congressman Lloyd Doggett speaks about the release this week of an immigrant rights activist from San Antonio.

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Fronteras
2:00 pm
Fri November 7, 2014

Analysts Say Latinos "Underwhelmed" By Candidates In 2014 Election

David Martin Davies TPR News

On Fronteras:
-- There was a lot of expectation and many predictions about the so-called “Latino vote” in the 2014 elections. We get a full recap from the polling and research firm, Latino Decisions.
-- Federal officials say the sickest five percent of Americans rack up more than half of all health care costs. We report on a program in San Diego that’s reducing emergency room visits and improving people’s health.
-- Rattlesnakes are just a part of life in West Texas. Most people try to steer clear of them. We meet a Fort Davis man with a love for snakes, who says they’re just misunderstood.

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Fronteras
8:24 pm
Fri October 31, 2014

New Study Shows Genetic Trait May Reduce Breast Cancer Risk for Some Hispanic Women

National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc.

On Fronteras-- Latinas are less likely to develop breast cancer than other ethnic groups. Now researchers think they know why. A new study shows a genetic variant may protect some Hispanic women from developing breast cancer. The largest immigrant detention facility in the country is under construction in South Texas. What’s unusual, though, is how the government bypassed the regular bidding process, giving the contract to a small Arizona town.

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Energy
1:35 pm
Tue October 28, 2014

Cartels Can Make Fracking In Mexico Expensive And Dangerous

Earlier this month, ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson visited Mexico City to discuss Mexico’s energy reforms with members of President Enrique Peña Nieto’s government. (David Brown/Greater Houston Partnership)

Originally published on Tue October 28, 2014 12:27 pm

Next year, Mexico will open its energy sector to foreign investors for the first time in more than 75 years.

Companies based in neighboring Texas stand to make a fortune by unlocking oil and gas trapped in Mexican shale plays, by means of hydraulic fracturing or “fracking.”

Getting at those hidden riches though could prove not just expensive, but dangerous. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Andrew Schneider of Houston Public Media reports.

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Fronteras
4:50 pm
Fri October 24, 2014

Universities And Greeks Unite To Confront Sexual Assault Related To Frat Culture

The SDSU chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon has a house in the center of "fraternity circle." They are known for throwing elaborate parties.
Katie Schoolov

On Fronteras: The attention paid to rape on college campuses has brought fraternity culture under a microscope. Some universities, and even some Greeks, are starting to confront sexual assault related to fraternity life. A journalist has been trekking the length of the entire Rio Grande in an attempt to get people to pay attention to the disappearing river. He hopes the journey will spur a serious discussion about rescuing a river that provides water to millions of people in two countries. As Mexico works to reform its energy industry, cartels are branching into fuel theft. Also, "inaugural poet" Richard Blanco talks about his memoir, "The Prince of Los Cocuyos."

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