The Source

Monday - Thursday from noon-1 p.m. on KSTX

The Source is a daily, one-hour call-in talk program that gives listeners in San Antonio the opportunity to call and connect with our in-studio guests and city-wide audience.

The Source seeks to give life, context and breadth to the events and issues affecting San Antonio by bringing newsmakers and experts to the public, and highlighting the people being affected by the news of the day. Hosted by veteran journalist David Martin Davies, and produced by Kim Johnson and Jan Ross Piedad.

Tune in to The Source for insightful discussion and analysis on topics that matter to residents of the Alamo City.

Support for The Source comes from contributors to the Community Engagement Fund, including The Gladys and Ralph Lazarus Foundation.

Contribute to the conversation:

  • Call us at: (210) 614-8980 during the show
  • Leave a voicemail at (210) 615-8982 anytime. Submissions may be played on-air
  • Tweet questions to:  @tprsource
  • E-mail comments to:  thesource@tpr.org

Got an idea for a show or want to suggest a must read? CLICK HERE 

Be sure to note if you have extensive experience or expertise on a particular show topic and include your phone number as we may call you for more information on your comment or story.

Ways to Connect

Chris Eudaily / TPR

The public square is the cornerstone of democracy. The concept is that anyone can hop on a metaphorical soapbox and air their grievances about the government.

But what does it take to be banned from the public square in San Antonio?

It’s happening to two local residents who are being shunned by their elected representatives. John Foddrill and Michael Cuellar are two separate cases but with some suspicious common factors. Both men are former city employees who say that while on the job they found evidence of fraud or waste in city government.

Marathon Maniac Larry Facebook Page

The last year saw the rise of the Latino vote in the 2012 election and San Antonio local "Marathon Maniac" Larry Macon break the World Record for marathons in a year -- he finished with 157. So what will happen in 2013?

Chris Eudaily / Texas Public Radio

The Mexican revolution drove people into the United States and those that settled in South Texas helped shape the cultural and economic landscape of the area. This is especially notable as the Hispanic population continues to increase in the United States, and the country -- as Mayor Julián Castro put it --  begins to look like San Antonio. The last part of the show highlights a performance of Tchaikovsky’s "The Nutcracker," a production that is a holiday tradition in San Antonio and the U.S.

Geekdom is celebrating its first anniversary and is looking to the future of continued growth and innovation. Local pre-K book series Arte Kids has become a national hit by using San Antonio's bi-lingual and bi-cultural roots.

Center for Refugee Services Facebook page

Their accounts of violence, oppression, and danger will astonish you, but not more than their determination to survive and thrive. Every year, San Antonio sees hundreds of refugees settled in the city. Strangers in a strange land - how well are these lost people getting along?

A special project from the UTSA Advanced Policy Social Work masters class wanted to find out – and inform the city.

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