Texas Matters

Fridays at 3:30 p.m., Saturdays at 6:30 a.m., and Sundays at 9:30 p.m.

Texas is a big state with a growing, diverse population and as the population grows, the issues and challenges facing its residents multiply.  Texas Matters is a statewide news program that spends half an hour each week looking at the issues and culture of Texas.

Texas Matters is hosted by David Martin Davies, who talks directly with policymakers and newsmakers in a lively discussion designed to shed light on issues often overlooked by other media.

David Martin Davies:

Davies is the host of "The Source" and a veteran journalist with over 20 years’ experience covering Texas, the border and Mexico. He is a regular contributor to NPR and American Public Media's "Marketplace." Davies also has written for "The San Antonio Light", "The San Antonio Express-News," "The Texas Observer" and others, and hosted KLRN public television’s interview program "Conversations."

Texas Matters is made possible by the UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures.

Migration Policy Institute

While GOP presidential front runner Donald Trump is touting his plan for a massive border wall that would bear his name and stretch the entire two-thousand mile border from Brownsville to San Diego, new numbers are coming to light that show that illegal immigration continues to be on the decline.

The Washington, D.C.-based Migration Policy Institute released "An Analysis of Unauthorized Immigrants in the United States by Country and Region of Birth."

After World War II, Mexican American veterans returned home to lead the struggle for civil rights.

Many of their stories have been recorded by the Voces Oral History Project founded and directed by Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez at the University of Texas at Austin School of Journalism.

In her new book “Texas Mexican Americans and Post War Civil Rights Rivas Rodriguez tells the stories of three lesser known battles in Mexican American civil rights in Texas.

German immigration had a major impact on the settlement of early Texas. The settlers came in droves as they sought land and opportunity. Many of the immigrants caught the bug to come to Texas from reading a book about the opportunities, nature and landscape of the Texas frontier. It was "Journey to Texas, 1833" by a German immigrant to Texas, D. T. F. (Detlef Thomas Friedrich) Jordt, aka Detlef Dunt.

Flickr User: 710928003 / cc

The number of incarcerated women in the U.S. has quadrupled since 1980 and a growing number of them are pregnant. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists estimates that 6 to 10 percent of women in correctional facilities are pregnant. And because incarcerated women often struggle with substance abuse or mental illness, they tend to have more complicated, higher-risk pregnancies that require more attention

Shelley Kofler / KERA-Dallas

The Texas Health and Human Services Commission says it is moving forward with cuts to Medicaid rates which were voted on by state lawmakers in the last legislative session.

Health care advocates say the plan will cause a $350 million drop in Medicaid payments to health care providers.

Supporters of the cuts have said this will bring Medicaid rates in Texas more in line with where rates should be.

Pages