Texas Matters

Fridays at 12:30 p.m. & Sundays at 9:30 p.m.

Texas is a big state with a growing, diverse population and as the population grows, the issues and challenges facing its residents multiply.  Texas Matters is a statewide news program that spends half an hour each week looking at the issues and culture of Texas.

Texas Matters is hosted by David Martin Davies, who talks directly with policymakers and newsmakers in a lively discussion designed to shed light on issues often overlooked by other media.

David Martin Davies:

Davies is the host of "The Source" and a veteran journalist with over 25 years’ experience covering Texas, the border and Mexico. He is a regular contributor to NPR and American Public Media's "Marketplace." Davies also has written for "The San Antonio Light", "The San Antonio Express-News," "The Texas Observer" and others, and hosted KLRN public television’s interview program "Conversations."

Texas Matters is made possible by the UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures.

Texas is the home of the Pantex Facility in Amarillo, an important part of the Department of Energy's nuclear weapons complex.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

Confederate monuments are continuing to be dismantled in Texas. Last week, San Antonio removed a statue dedicated to fallen Confederate soldiers. 

NPR

This week, the Trump administration announced an end of the Obama-era program which protected young immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children from deportation. The policy is known as DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.


As the world's largest Baptist university, Baylor is unabashedly Christian. There is a strict code of conduct for all students that forbids, with the threat of expulsion, any sex outside of marriage, alcohol drinking, drug use, pornography and other acts. Students weren't allowed to dance on campus until 1996.

During the last several years, however, Baylor officials were hiding a dark secret: Female students were being sexually assaulted at an alarming rate by members of the school's football team.

Audie Murphy the icon wasn't born on the big screen, but on the battlefields of Europe. Murphy, as a diminutive boy of 17, lied about his age to join the Army—the only branch that would take him—and went on to become the most distinguished and decorated warrior of World War II. Pretty good for a poor Texas boy, who was the son of sharecroppers.

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