Texas Standard

Weekdays, 10 a.m.

From fascinating innovations that reshape technology to shifting demographics that transform the nation, from political leaders to pop culture icons – what happens in Texas drives the American narrative. So why let New York, Washington and Los Angeles shape our sense of the world? 

Texas Standard is setting a new bar for broadcast news coverage, offering crisp, up-to-the-moment coverage of politics, lifestyle and culture, the environment, technology and innovation, and business and the economy – from a Texas perspective – and uncovering stories as they happen and spotting the trends that will shape tomorrow’s headlines.

 

The one-hour daily news magazine is grounded in the best traditions of American journalism: fact-based, independent and politically neutral reporting. In an era in which news outlets, politics and citizens are increasingly polarized, Texas Standard offers critical breadth, variety and integrity.

 

Hosted by award-winning journalist David Brown, Texas Standard features interviews with researchers, innovators, business leaders, political thinkers and experts – across Texas and around the globe – that reflect a diversity of opinions.

 

Texas Standard is produced in the state capital in collaboration with KUT Austin, KERA North Texas, Houston Public Media and Texas Public Radio San Antonio, as well as news organizations across Texas, Mexico and the United States.

From Texas Standard.

On Monday, the Washington Post broke the story of the now-defunct voter fraud commission purchasing Texas voter records. The story began:

“President Donald Trump’s voting commission asked every state and the District of Columbia for detailed voter registration data, but in Texas’ case it took an additional step: It asked to see Texas records that identify all voters with Hispanic surnames, newly released documents show.”

Officials from both the White House and the state of Texas say the data was never delivered, because of a lawsuit brought by Texas voting rights advocates after the request was made.

From Texas Standard.

A pair of developments over the weekend have all eyes on Texas Democrats. Just before midnight on Friday, the Dallas County GOP filed a lawsuit seeking to remove 128 Democratic candidates from the county ballot. Republicans say the candidates’ paperwork didn’t include an authentic signature of Democratic party chair, Carol Donovan.

Gromer Jeffers, a political writer for the Dallas Morning News, says there’s evidence that someone other than Donovan signed the candidates’ filing petitions.

From Texas Standard:

President Donald Trump took office a year ago promising to ramp up border security. New data from the Hope Border Institute and the Borderland Immigration Council show the situation for asylum-seekers has gotten worse. The U.S. can’t turn away migrants who express fear of persecution; they're legally entitled to a screening interview to see if they qualify for asylum. But new data show asylum-seekers are being denied those interviews and being mistreated, both at the border and while in detention.

From Texas Standard.

Global warming and climate change are two oft-used phrases in the conversation about energy production. Much of the time, scientists and reporters present the remedy as “green” energy, such as solar or wind. But there’s a lot we still don’t know about the climate effects of these energy sources.

Texas leads the nation in wind energy production, so it makes sense that researchers from New York would turn to the Lone Star State to study how wind power affects local climates.

From Texas Standard.

Scientists, researchers, and volunteers along the Gulf Coast have been working at a fever pitch to save hundreds of sea turtles that have washed up on Texas coastal shores – alive but stunned by the cold. It’s not an unusual phenomenon, but researchers say this year has seen a record-breaking number of turtles.

Dr. Donna Shaver, the Chief of the Sea Turtle Science and Recovery Division at Padre Island National Seashore, says they’ve found 2,980 turtles so far.

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