Fiesta 2013

Joey Palacios / TPR

Cornyation, the annual spoof of San Antonio during Fiesta, generates money for AIDS- and HIV-based charities and this year more than $150,000 was returned to the community as a result of the three-night show.

Though the show is not necessarily exclusive to the gay community, HIV and AIDS issues tend to resonate within that group.

Joey Palacios / TPR

For three days the traditional Fiesta is turned upside down as an event known as Cornyation rips apart political correctness and turns it into a stage act dramatizing current events.

Cornyation may be lewd, but the party with the purpose is left intact, the spoof on the Fiesta Coronation takes place April 23-25 at the Empire Theater.

This year there are about 12 Cornyation skits, and each one pokes fun at something different: Childhood obesity, the nearly retired Twinkie, Gov. Rick Perry and sonograms, the NRA, a pensioned Pope, and even Manti Te'o.

Palo Alto College

Now in its 10th year, today's PACfest at Palo Alto College is a free family-friendly event that  offers games for kids, and has plenty of music for everyone.

PACfest is one of the few Fiesta events that offers no alcoholic beverages, and PACfest Co-chair Carmen Velasquez said it provides plenty of opportunities for families to enjoy themselves.

U.S. Army

Wednesday's Soldier Show at the Alamo is one of the unique military Fiesta events, and visitors to this year's event found both the Commanding General of Army North, Lt. Gen. Bill Caldwell, and the second in command, Major Gen. Perry Wiggins dancing the electric slide to the tunes of Fort Sam's Own, a band made up of members of the 323rd Army Band.

Officers handed out Army Fiesta medals during the show, and soldiers lined up to shake the hands of citizens who wanted to say "thank you" for their service. 

Eileen Pace / TPR News

The San Antonio Conservation Society is hard at work putting together the final touches in La Villita for Night in Old San Antonio, a tradition dating back nearly 100 years.

"We started back in the 1920’s when the city wanted to do an Indian festival, and so we stepped forward and put on a very short one night festival for that," said NIOSA treasurer Barb Machado. "Then it grew and they tried a couple of things along the banks of the Riverwalk and then after that they decided to turn it into this."

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