2012 Bond

Nathan Cone / TPR News

Thousands of drivers who use Hausman Road as a shortcut from Loop 1604 to I-10 are starting to see some progress on one of the most-heavily traveled roadways in the city. Utilities are going in along the first section of road project nearest Loop 1604.

The widening of Hausman Road will proceed in quadrants to make it easier on the 17,000 drivers that go up and down the road each week. Work began in December to prepare the first section nearest 1604 for utilities.

District 8 Councilman Ron Nirenberg said his predecessors got the project to the voters.

City of San Antonio

It’s pretty much just an overgrown and forbidding area on the Southside -- the space beneath the I-35 overpass between Theo and Malone -- but here your tax dollars have created something special in Ballroom Luminoso, a public art project that has won the SXSW Eco Award for Transformative Design in the Public Space Design Competition.

The transformative design award recognizes excellence in how a design shapes or reinterprets the physical environment.

Frank Gonzales / COSA photographer

Underneath heavily-traveled Interstate 35 at Theo and Malone, in an unexpected place for art, six spherical chandeliers bathe the ground, concrete columns and underside of the bridge with rich, vibrant color and transform an otherwise industrial thoroughfare into an enjoyable space for pedestrians and drivers.

Ballroom Luminoso is the first public art project to be completed under the new bond program approved by voters in 2012.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The city has concluded work on a project it started ten months ago to address drainage on Old Highway 90 along Westwood Village Creek. Many other projects from the 2007-2012 bond program are also nearing completion.

Joey Palacios / Texas Public Radio

The city is starting a three-year project along Woodlawn Lake Park to address flooding and create safer routes for pedestrians and cyclists.

The Woodlawn and Jefferson Neighborhoods are especially prone to flooding, and the potential for a repeat of flood events like 1998 and 2002 have residents like Henrietta Lagrange concerned.

"I live right in front, so I have mega-pictures," Lagrange said in reference to previous flooding. "I’m there, sometimes, sleepless nights trying to see how high the water is going to get."