Affirmative Action

From Texas Standard:

The court upheld an affirmative action program at the University of Texas at Austin, ending a legal battle that started in 2008.

In Fisher v. the University of Texas, Abigail Fisher, a white student, sued the university for using race as a factor in college admissions. The decision sets a national precedent, at least for the time being.

Justices on the U.S. Supreme Court in a narrow decision on Thursday decided that UT-Austin’s “use of race” in deciding its college admissions was constitutional.  It's a ruling that will forever impact the lives of prospective college students and the future of college admissions policies.

In a 4-3 decision, the Supreme Court of the United States has upheld the University of Texas' affirmative action program.

"The race-conscious admissions program in use at the time of petitioner's application is lawful under the Equal Protection Clause," the court held.

Allison Shelley / The Texas Tribune

The U.S. Supreme Court this morning upheld a Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals earlier decision that the University of Texas at Austin can use affirmative action when considering student admissions.

In a 4-3 decision, the high court rejected Abigail Fisher’s claim that she was discriminated against because she is white in her application to UT. She was denied admission in 2008, but filed a lawsuit arguing that black and Hispanic students who were less qualified got in instead of her.

Allison Shelley / The Texas Tribune

A federal civil rights lawsuit brought against the University of Texas admissions policy will be resolved by the U.S Supreme Court this month.  And  it could mean whether colleges and universities can use a person’s race as a component of their admissions policy.

The case was first filed in 2008 after Abigail Fisher alleged she was disqualified from admission at UT-Austin because she is white.  As part of the university admission’s policy, race can benefit consideration.

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