Art

Fronteras
9:05 am
Fri December 13, 2013

Declining Fertility In America Worries Economists, Could Immigration Reform Offer A Solution?

The majority of respondents, 89 percent, said they had experienced “a little” to “a great deal” of discrimination.
Tom Wong UC San Diego

A survey of Latinos in San Diego County finds that many face discrimination. Fewer Americans are choosing to have children. Some experts say this could have disastrous effects for the country's economic future. We speak to an International Bank of Commerce official who says America will need to import more workers to fill job shortages. When photographer Wes Naman invited friends to pose for a series of what was meant to be goofy portraits, neither he nor his models had any idea the images would end up reaching millions of people across the globe. More on why this Albuquerque artist's photos of distorted faces went viral.

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Movie Interviews
4:00 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Teller Breaks His Silence To Talk 'Tim's Vermeer'

Directed by Teller, of the magic act Penn and Teller, Tim's Vermeer follows Tim Jenison (above) as he attempts to re-create the methods and work of the Dutch master.
Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 6:12 pm

The documentary Tim's Vermeer follows inventor Tim Jenison on a singular project — the attempt to paint in the way the 17th century Flemish master Johannes Vermeer painted.

Jenison was inspired by Vermeer's paintings and by the book Secret Knowledge, in which the contemporary English artist David Hockney theorized that Renaissance painters might have achieved photographic accuracy by employing tools that anticipated photography.

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Deceptive Cadence
9:23 am
Sun December 1, 2013

Da Vinci's String Organ Must Be Heard To Be Believed

Pianist Slawomir Zubrzycki presents the "viola organista" on Oct. 18 in Krakow, Poland. Zubrzycki spent almost four years building the instrument, which is based on a late 15th-century design by Leonardo da Vinci.
Tomasz Wiech AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 10:41 am

The man who painted the Mona Lisa, and was the first to sketch out the helicopter and the submarine, also dabbled in music. So here's the question: What musical instrument did Leonardo da Vinci design?

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Code Switch
3:47 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

What Do We Mean When We Talk About 'Latino Art'?

Radiante, Olga Albizu
Courtesy of the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 5:42 pm

When the Whitney Museum of American Art announced the artists for its 2014 biennial, people took to the Internet to chime in about who's been included and who's been left out; the last biennial had been blasted for ignoring Latino artists. But when a new show opened at the Smithsonian American Art Museum featuring only Latino artists — "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" — it was blasted for other reasons.

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Arts & Culture
12:31 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

World War II Portraits Get A Color Makeover At Boerne Library Exhibit

Artist Chris Demarest
Jack Morgan TPR Arts

Your local library may have revolving displays of period museum collections or perhaps paintings hanging on the walls of their public gallery, but they probably don’t have this.

Chris Demarest is the painter who created about 30 paintings of World War II servicemen and women that are on display at the Patrick Heath Public Library in Boerne. You may still be asking: what’s so different about that?

"I bring my easel wherever I go, so I work in public" Demarest explained.

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Arts & Culture
3:00 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Religion And Science Mix In New Southwest School Of Art Exhibit

Southwest School of Art

Artist Chris Sauter wants you to question the notions of religion and science, and how they interact -- or don't interact.

"If you’re a religious person you can’t really believe in science and if you’re a scientific person you can’t really believe in religion," he said. "I think that’s a fallacy."

So Sauter creates art to get you to think about how they have a certain overlap. Soon, he will have four themed exhibitions in four separate locations.

"The Southwest School exhibition is the first," he said. "It opens on November 21."

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Arts & Culture
3:53 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Spare Parts Fills A Local Educational Need For Art Supplies

Mary Elizabeth Cantu (center) and volunteers.
Chris Castillo

When the legislature chopped $5 billion out of the school budgets in 2011, it had an unexpected result here in San Antonio. An organization was created called Spare Parts.

"It was pretty painful, the cuts in education," said Mary Elizabeth Cantu, founder of Spare Parts.

So her organization tried to provide some of what the budget no longer did, art supplies.

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Arts & Culture
10:36 am
Fri November 8, 2013

New McNay Exhibit Questions Personal Style And Accepted Taste

After Boucher 1, oil on canvas.
photo: Megan Roche

A new exhibit at the McNay by Illinois artist Rosayln Schwartz takes conventions from master paintings and re-interprets them, challenging the "arbiter of taste," those who decide what is and isn't "high quality."

"What I do in a sense is to try to pervert that experience by changing colors to these lurid, almost neon-like colors that I use to create these old master reenactments." Schwartz said. "And what I find so interesting is that people are drawn to the work, they’re seduced by the work because of this mastery."

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Arts & Culture
4:30 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

Carver Cultural Center Artist Calls On A Rain God For Inspiration

Atl Exhibit at the Carver Cultural Center
Phil Castillo

An exhibit at the Carver Cultural Center features works by Roberto Jose Gonzalez, who cites a less-than-common muse for his new exhibit: A rain god.

"The exhibit is entitled Atl" Gonzalez said. "Atl is one of the rain gods, one of the rain deities in Mexico. This exhibition is devoted to creating works that are my vision, my interpretation of that particular rain God."

San Antonian Gonzalez is originally from Laredo, but traces his family tree much farther back.

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Local Business
9:27 am
Thu October 31, 2013

San Antonio's Economic Growth Tied To Creative Industry Success

Creative industries in San Antonio include culinary arts
Eileen Pace TPR News

The arts are growing in San Antonio, and have grown each year since the recession ended.

This year's Economic Impact of the Creative Industry on San Antonio report shows a slight but significant increase over last year, just one to two percent, but Dr. Steve Nivin at St. Mary’s University said the increase has been steady over the past few years. 

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