Arts and Culture

Shen Yun Performing Arts

From a nostalgic joyride to Easter celebrations to Chinese dance, here are some top picks to keep you busy this holiday weekend.

Broadway Corridor Exhibit-Downtown:

There's one last chance to catch "1000 Parks and a Line in The Sky" at the Institute of Texan Cultures. The exhibit, about both the past and the future in San Antonio, closes April 16.  

"We have built a fifty, almost a 60-foot model that is lit up and exhibited where we are showing a possible route for the Skyride," says Dr. Antonio Petrov, professor of architecture at UTSA.

Progress continues to be made on the San Pedro Creek project and now it's reached a noteworthy milestone. That milestone is in hiring Carrie Brown as the project's public art curator.

Images courtesy of the McNay Art Museum

There’s lots going on this weekend but music, in its many forms dominates.

First off on Saturday night Paula Sullivan says you should head to Carmen's de la Calle for something she calls...

"Resistance is flutetile."

She didn't say futile--flutile, like flutes. The downtown nightclub likes to match up instruments and performers just to see what happens.

"This Saturday it's two flutes played by Katchie Cartwright and Rene Saenz."

Before Hill Country Opera celebrates its fourth birthday in February, it's celebrating New Year's Eve. 

"We have an event coming up in New Braunfels at the Seekatz Opera House," says Hill Country Opera President Arden Dorn. "We are hoping to convert New Braunfels to old Vienna, Austria."

Joan Marcus

It's been a Broadway smash for years, and now it's back in San Antonio. One of the production's stars is, no surprise, really impressed with the production. He's Billy Tighe, and he thinks The Book of Mormon's magic all started with those who wrote it, because they saw something in a highly unlikely subject.

"The creators of South Park and Bobby Lopez were endlessly fascinated by it and knew there was a well of  comedy in there," says Tighe.