B-Cycle

Eileen Pace / TPR News

After 4 years, 55 stations, and hundreds of thousands of rides, San Antonio B-Cycle is rethinking it's future, and whether growing the system of rentable bikes is appropriate given its budget.

Reported in the Rivard Report last week, after years of small budgets, and limited funding from sponsors and and city government, organization head Cindi Snell is considering leaving the pro-bono position. 

Jack Morgan

For a small slice of time—only about 18 months in fact—the Pony Express carried letters on an 1800 mile trek from Missouri to California. The telegraph spelled the end for the Pony Express, but now 154 years later it’s being remembered in a quirky, even romantic way.

Imagine the sounds of a typewriter.  Do you remember that sound? If so, you probably weren’t raised texting. At the Briscoe Western Art Museum they have a vintage Remington typewriter, and you can put it to good use. Beth Folds is with the Briscoe.

Nan Palmero http://bit.ly/1iHGDRR

This Friday, downtown dwellers are encouraged to walk or ride their bikes to work as part of the 18th annual Walk and Roll Rally, but is San Antonio a bicycle friendly town?

Does San Antonio have the infrastructure, awareness and smarts to support a vibrant cycling community? And what does a city with that look like?

Guests:

Eileen Pace

Downtowners have been noticing some new signage pointing out major attractions in the Center City. Dozens of new signs have gone up that also help cyclists locate the nearest B-cycle station.

A lot has been going on in the first half of the "Decade of Downtown": There is Center City Development, a new Travis Park, River North, and all of the development efforts together creating a fresh crop of restaurants, bars and coffee shops and a need to get around.

Eileen Pace / TPR News

A new report shows new technologies are helping people reduce the number of miles they drive, which may be a hard sell to those who have to sit in traffic on IH-35 or Hwy. 281 every day.

The largest decrease in driving miles was found to be among Millennials -- the new driving generation that will dominate driving trends in the future.

Sara Smith, program director for the Texas Public Interest Research Group, said they compiled statistics from the Federal Highway Administration and found a reduction in miles traveled over the last decade.

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