bats

Jacqueline Ferrato / Bat Conservation International

 

San Antonio City Councilman Ron Nirenberg announced an agreement last week to protect the world’s largest bat cave from encroachment by future development.

The city will join with several other entities to turn the 1,500-acre property, known as Crescent Hills, into a conservation easement that will permanently protect the area’s natural resources. 

San Antonio River Authority

The San Antonio River Authority is again offering its bat educational program on the Museum Reach to raise awareness about the bats’ relationship to our environment. 

This is the SARA’s fifth year for "Bat Loco," an informational program that coincides with the bats’ colonization after their return to South Texas from Mexico.

Hill Country Alliance

The future of the Bracken Bat cave is far from resolved. The cave, which has the largest maternal bat colony in the world, made news last summer when Galo Properties announced a planned housing development near the cave. The announcement caused an uproar from both water conservation and bat advocates.

Eileen Pace / TPR News

After their winter trip south, Mexican free-tailed bats are returning to the Bracken Bat Cave in Central Texas in larger numbers, which is good news for South Texas agriculture.

Millions of Mexican free-tailed bats make their summer home at the Bracken Cave just north of San Antonio, and farmers in South Texas rely on them to swarm across their farmland and eat the insects that can destroy crops.

Lackland Air Force Base
Eileen Pace / TPR News

Bat experts have determined a bat colony has established itself inside the walls of a 45-year-old dorm building at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland. 

More than 200 Lackland recruits are on a rabies vaccine regimen after several bats were discovered in their dorm a couple of weeks ago. But the building is huge, and although the dorms were secured and entrances sealed off, it took experts a longer time to find the bat colony that was discovered over the weekend.

Pages