Bioscience-Medicine

Bioscience-Medicine news from Texas Public Radio reporters.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Bioscience-Medicine News Desk including  Xenex Disinfection Services, the John and Rita Feik Foundation, the John and Susan Kerr Charitable Foundation, the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Jean Cheever and San Antonio Technology Center.  Additional support comes from Cappy and Suzy Lawton and InCube Labs.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

Infertility can be heartbreaking for many couples struggling to have their own biological children. Some scientists at the University of Texas at San Antonio are trying to understand the mystery of male infertility. And they’re conducting their research one cell at a time.

Methodist Specialty and Transplant Hospital

The first successful living donor kidney transplant took place in 1984. Since that time, more than 50,000 people have had one of their two kidneys removed and implanted in someone who needed that organ to live.

In today’s TPR Lifeline, Bioscience-Medicine Reporter Wendy Rigby talks with Adam Bingaman, MD, of Methodist Specialty and Transplant Hospital in San Antonio about the need for more kidney donors.

BioMed SA

The nonprofit group BioMed SA chose a Florida bioengineer as the recipient of its 2017 Award for Innovation Healthcare and Bioscience. His inventions have impacted millions.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

The misuse of prescription drugs is on the rise in the U-S, fueling the growing opioid epidemic. That’s why disposing of unused medications the right way is so important.

This weekend, MedDropSA is hosting a drug drop off event. It’s Saturday from 8 until 1 at Alamo City Christian Fellowship Church, 6500 Interstate 35 North.

You must present a picture ID and a recent copy of your CPS bill to qualify to use the service.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

Of the 20 locally-acquired cases of Chagas disease in 2016 in Texas, Bexar County had the most. Chagas disease is caused by a parasite carried by kissing bugs. This rare condition is now catching the attention of the local medical community.

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