Bioscience-Medicine

Bioscience-Medicine news from Texas Public Radio reporters.

Texas Public Radio is supported by contributors to the Bioscience-Medicine News Desk including  Xenex Disinfection Services, the John and Rita Feik Foundation, the John and Susan Kerr Charitable Foundation, the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Jean Cheever and San Antonio Technology Center.  Additional support comes from Cappy and Suzy Lawton and InCube Labs.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

A possible cure for diabetes is on the horizon for the millions of people who suffer from the disease. The important research is being conducted in San Antonio. The technique is designed to make the body produce insulin on its own again.

Diabetic patients have to use finger pricks to check blood sugar and insulin shots to control their glucose levels.

The burn unit at the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research in San Antonio, Texas, is hot. Sometimes, it gets up to 102 degrees in there, among the patients.

People with severe burns can't regulate their own body temperatures well, so the air has to keep them warm.

"We see a lot of gruesome stuff," says physical therapist Melissa Boddington. At the height of the fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan, more than 1,000 wounded service members were flown to the hospital.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

The SA Cancer Council supports the UT Health Cancer Center by raising money to provide transportation, emergency financial support for patients in need, and funding for research. The group raised money Monday by honoring two extraordinary people.

Cancer is the most complicated disease and one of the most difficult to treat. It often upends patient’s lives. Volunteer of the Year Carla Bergner saw a need and helped create the first medically based food pantry in San Antonio. Cancer patients who lack good nutrition can find it on site when they receive treatment at the UT Health Cancer Center.

DennisM2 via Flickr Creative Commons

The Food and Drug Administration has approved marketing of genetic testing for the health risk for 10 diseases. The Alzheimer’s Association says don’t count on it to tell you the risk of developing that particular memory-robbing disorder.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

The Texas Department of State Health Services is expanding its recommendation for who needs to be tested for the Zika virus.

As the weather warms and mosquitoes are more plentiful, state health officials are casting a wider net to detect pregnant women who may be infected with the Zika virus.

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