border issues

Ryan E. Poppe

The 84th Texas legislative session wrapped up this week.  It was hit and miss for some Republicans promising to crack down on border security and immigration.  

On the campaign trail and at the start of the session, statewide elected officials like Lt. Governor Dan Patrick spoke passionately about plans to crack down on border security

And border security is one of the many things Patrick listed as an accomplishment this session.

ROBSTOWN, Texas — A former South Texas reserve deputy is accused of trying to smuggle several non-U.S. citizens into the country.

Federal court documents show Robstown police arrested Luis Enrique Guevara after authorities found three Guatemalan citizens inside the vehicle he was driving. Officers had pulled Guevara over for speeding and for having electronic devices on his dashboard that obstructed his view from the windshield.

This Week On Fronteras:

-- The families and classmates of 43 missing Mexican college students traveled across the U.S. to raise awareness for their situation.

-- A movement is underway to prevent suicides by freeing immigrant mothers and their children from detention centers.

-- From New Mexico, here’s some stereotype defying information about gun violence.

-- The best bilingual teacher in the U.S. hails from Dallas.

-- A talk with the directors of the new border documentary, Western.

Ross Brothers

If you’re looking for talking heads in Bill and Turner Ross’s documentaries, you won’t find them. Their documentaries capture the essence of the people and places they film, from nocturnal New Orleans to a small Ohio town. Their latest portrait, Western, was shot in Eagle Pass and Piedras Negras, Mexico. The Ross brothers were there as the twin communities, united in one culture, slowly fractured from encroaching border violence and the construction of the border fence.

The drug war in Mexico continues to takes lives. Streets along the border have become battle fields as cartels challenge each other for territory and clash with the Mexican military forces. Sometimes it takes fiction to explain and decipher the impact of the harsh realities like the drug war. It's able bring to the page the maelstrom of emotions of what’s it like to be collateral damage in this conflict that’s tearing your motherland apart.

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