Brazil

On June 11 — one day before the World Cup started — two policemen picked up three black teenagers in Rio de Janeiro. The three hadn't committed any crime — but they did have a history of petty offenses.

The officers drove them up to the wooded hills above the city. One was shot in the head and killed. One was shot in the leg and the back and left for dead. Another escaped.

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

First Listen: Bebel Gilberto, 'Tudo'

Aug 11, 2014

A soft, breezy summer record, Tudo befits Bebel Gilberto's status as a member of Brazilian musical royalty. The daughter of João Gilberto and singer Miúcha, as well as the niece of the legendary Chico Buarque, she crafts a work that's light but never boring.

This is not your parents' Brazilian music.

This is the Brazil where samba, bossa nova and Musica Popular Brasileira meet hip-hop, rock, jazz and electronica. Underneath all the contemporary mash ups is the DNA that makes Brazilian music some of the most vibrant on the planet: Interlocking rhythms that go right to the hips; melodies that never seem to veer into the somber minor keys; and drums of all shapes and sizes.

Much of the stories over the past few days about the World Cup have been about how what is arguably the world's football mecca has given the every-four-year spectacle a less than enthusiastic welcome.

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