breast cancer

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

Some San Antonio scientists are developing a new drug that could help save the lives of women whose breast cancer comes back. Recurrent tumors are common and often deadly. This new agent is showing great promise.

A noisy centrifuge, a carefully controlled incubator, a bench full of busy scientists working on cancer cell lines -- all can be found in a lab is where basic science and medical need intersect.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

Surgeons have several options when it comes to rebuilding breasts after surgery related to breast cancer. But for replacing nipples, women have fewer choices.

A startup biotechnology company in San Antonio is working to develop a better way to rebuild nipples after cancer surgery. Two young scientists saw a niche and decided to try and fill it.

Virginia Kaklamani, MD / UT Health San Antonio Cancer Center

Being overweight puts women at greater risk for breast cancer. It also increases the chance the cancer will come back. New research shows shedding extra pounds can help protect women under 60 from a cancer recurrence.

"I had never had a mammogram. And I found a lump," said San Antonian Gina Capparelli. At age 50, she was stunned by a breast cancer diagnosis that led to surgery, chemotherapy and radiation.

Wendy Rigby / Texas Public Radio

More than 7,000 researchers from 90 countries are meeting this week at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

One of the San Antonio doctors sharing his research has exciting news about how aspirin could help extend the lives of patients.

Women are less likely to die of breast cancer than they were a decade ago, but not all women are benefiting from that trend.

White women saw more of a drop in death rates than black women — 1.9 percent a year from 2010 to 2014, compared to a 1.5 percent decrease for black women, according to a report published Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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