budget

City of San Antonio

If an amendment remains in place when San Antonio City Council votes on the budget this week, then the doors at city libraries will stay open all week long.

Library board chair Jean Brady cautioned that nothing is final until the city council votes Thursday on the proposed budget. But right now it looks like library funding will be restored to keep branch libraries open.

"If this funding’s been restored then that means we’ll be at seven days a week doing business as usual," Brady said Monday. "We’re delighted."

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

In the first segment:

We look at the city's fitness goals with P.E. teacher and chief, Mayor Julián Castro. With the recent announcements that both San Antonio and the nation as a whole are seeing a drop in obesity rates among different segments of the population, are we more conscious of our health?

What role can the city play in promoting health?

In the second segment:

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

In a news conference following the City Council meeting where City Manager Sheryl Sculley presented next year’s proposed budget, she summed up the process in three words: Tough budget year.

Sculley and her team found $13.5 million in cuts, mostly administrative, but that doesn’t make up for the $35 million -$50 million gap the city is facing. Other measures and cuts will have to be made.

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

Ahead of the start of classes on Aug. 26, San Antonio City Council members are hosting community-wide back-to-school fairs in each of their districts.

At the same time, the city's budget is closing in on adoption and deep cuts will have to be made. Mayor Julián Castro is recommending a cut to member discretionary funds, which are known as City Council Project Funds and are used for community events like the back-to-school fairs.

Currently each district gets more than $61,000.

Ryan Loyd / Texas Public Radio

The San Antonio City Council will again hear from city staff on a proposed budget that has a budget gap of up to $50 million dollars.

For that reason, city manager Sheryl Sculley and her team have been meeting with each city department and going over their programs to figure out how to close that gap.

Sculley says she will not reduce the most important city services to the public, including police and fire protection. That was also the request of city council members who outlined their priorities for the budget last month.

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