City of San Antonio

Paul Flahive, Texas Public Radio

San Antonio's San Pedro Springs Park, the second oldest city park in the United States, is getting some needed updates.

The city is spending $1.8 million to create a perimeter trail with LED lighting, additional signage and monument walls.  The improvements were identified by residents in the 2013 Master Plan update.

City Archeologist Kay Hines says the changes will make the park more inviting.

City of San Antonio / cc

As the city of San Antonio examines whether or not to annex the largest swath of land in decades, many are pushing back against the city practice. Several bills have been filed in the 84th Legislature to make it more difficult to grab up unincorporated areas.

The bills have failed to muster much support with nearly all of them dying in committee, but the number of bills filed gives an indication of how unpopular annexation is to several Texas communities.

Big changes may be coming to downtown. The first skyscraper in 25 years, a new high-end development that would remove the blighted Solo Serve building, and a Houston Street that is making a comeback are all bringing life to an area that has served as a thoroughfare for tourists heading from San Fernando Cathedral to the Alamo. 

Will San Antonio see the downtown renewal that is has dreamed about for so long?

Guests:

Ryan Loyd / TPR News

Early Voting continues in San Antonio's municipal elections. In addition to 10 council jobs and a Mayor's chair, a charter amendment was proposed to raise the pay for those elected city officials to a salary level. 

San Antonio is the only large city in Texas to not pay a full-time salary to its elected city leaders. Under the current system Council Members are paid $20 per meeting and the Mayor is paid a stipend of $4,040.

San Antonio has a big population and a large footprint. The next Mayor of the city will have to deal with impending issues like urban redevelopment, gentrification, water conservation, growing industry, and a myriad of transportation issues.

Where the city goes can be directed by a Mayor's vision. We invited four of the leading candidate in next month's city election to discover their visions for San Antonio. We invite your calls (210-614-8980) and emails (thesource [at] tpr.org).

Guests:

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