Classical

Deceptive Cadence
4:23 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Beethoven's Famous 4 Notes: Truly Revolutionary Music

An autographed portrait of Ludwig van Beethoven.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 20, 2012 10:00 am

A new book, a new recording and some old instruments, all addressing the most memorable phrase in music: the opening of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony.

Matthew Guerrieri has written a book about this symphony, called The First Four Notes: Beethoven's Fifth and the Human Imagination. Guerrieri writes about how Beethoven's piece resonated with everyone from revolutionaries to Romantics, and German nationalists to anti-German resistance fighters.

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Arts & Culture
1:51 pm
Mon November 19, 2012

Musica Antiqua Live, Sunday 11/25

San Antonio's two period-instrument early music ensembles will join forces to present a concert that traces the evolution of musical styles from the Renaissance to the Baroque. Ensemble Cazona performs on copies of Renaissance-era recorders. Retablo will perform music of the 18th century using Baroque recorder and traverso with viola da gamba, harpsichord, and theorbo. This concert will take place at 3:00 on Sunday, November 25, in the Chapel of the Incarnate Word on the campus of Incarnate Word University located at 4301 Broadway. This event is free and open to the public.

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Classical Spotlight
11:07 am
Mon November 19, 2012

A Queen Of Dramatic Roles: Joyce DiDonato Is Simply Regal In Latest Release

Drama Queens, now out on EMI/Virgin Classics
Courtesy of EMI

Beloved and rarities abound on Drama Queens

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KPAC blog: The Piano
1:03 pm
Fri November 16, 2012

Beethoven Pushes The Envelope

Artur Schnabel
Wikipedia

In the 3 sonatas of Opus 10, Ludwig van Beethoven was making a statement about his pianistic abilities, and one thing he knew that would certainly attract attention was contrast. The composer asks for double fortes, throws in unexpected rests, and invents the heroic funeral movement that he would exploit in future symphonies. This is all in the third sonata in D Major.

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10:09 am
Fri November 16, 2012

John Williams Tops Poll of Best Film Composers

Lead in text: 
The showbiz trade Variety recently polled 40 composers active in the movie industry, asking for their top three film scores of all time. John Williams came out on top with the most mentions, while Ennio Morricone's score for "The Mission" was ranked as Best Score overall. Read the entire article after the jump.
Ennio Morricone's original music for Roland Joffe's 1986 film "The Mission" landed on top of a Variety poll of 40 active composers who were asked to name their top three original movie scores of all time in order of preference.
KPAC blog: Saturday Afternoon At The Opera
11:48 am
Thu November 15, 2012

One Of The Greatest Operas Ever Written: Wagner’s 'Parsifal'

Richard & Cosima Wagner
Wikipedia

Richard Wagner’s Parsifal, his final opera, was created in parallel with his greatest creations including The Ring and Tristan. Beginning in the 1850’s, its prose and poetry was returned to over and over again in first and second drafts, and was finally orchestrated and presented in 1882; it occupied over a quarter century in Wagner’s creative life. The work was scored with the acoustics of the newly built Bayreuth in mind and has one of the oddest operatic history’s imaginable.

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KPAC Blog
4:58 pm
Mon November 12, 2012

Movie/Music Review: Soundtrack For New Bond Movie 'Skyfall' Soars

Composer Thomas Newman
Credit Simon Fernandez/Wikipedia

This weekend, the latest James Bond film opened and earned over 87 million dollars. Thomas Newman  is the ninth composer in the James Bond series' history, and his score for "Skyfall" is masterful. He has worked with director Sam Mendes as composer before, with "American Beauty" and "Jarhead."

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Arts & Culture
8:30 am
Mon November 12, 2012

John Williams' Inevitable Themes

Flanked by composer Leonard Slatkin and soprano Jessye Norman, John Williams takes a bow during his 80th-birthday celebration at Tanglewood in August.
Stu Rosner

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 9:52 am

For more than 50 years, John Williams' music has taken us to galaxies far, far away through adventures here on earth, made us feel giddy joy and occasionally scared us to death.

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3:46 pm
Fri November 9, 2012

Goodbye Emerson! Hello Music!

Lead in text: 
They are a staple on air, and perhaps in your record collection. My first SACMS concert brought the Emerson Quartet here in San Antonio, and I was invited to have dinner with them. We had just met up in Harrisburg where I had left that spring, and they had played. Now, cellist David Finckel has left the quartet and is writing about it. Do you have a great Emerson story or musical memory?
Having announced that I would be vacating my chair as cellist of the Emerson String Quartet I had sailed through the rest of the densely-packed 2011-12 winter season, putting off for a future date the heavy thinking that I knew would come into play as my final year of concerts approached.
KPAC blog: The Piano
10:00 am
Fri November 9, 2012

When Beethoven Became The Man: A New World Of Sound And Fury With The Opus 10

listal.com

Arrogant, willful and brusque, not paying attention to how he dressed or even to combing his hair, Ludwig van Beethoven wasn't a man cut out for high society. Luckily in Vienna, the upper crust loved and understood music, and with that introduction, Beethoven was exactly in the right place.

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