Classical

Texas Public Radio Classical Music blog and other stories.

This week, we saw the end of a three-month strike by Fort Worth Symphony musicians.  The players and management agreed on a four-year contract. The deal freezes wages for two years and provides small raises the last two. An unnamed donor gave the orchestra $700,000, clearing the symphony’s deficit. But there’s more to do. 

In the world of ballet, The Nutcracker is sort of a gateway drug. Choreographer Christopher Wheeldon danced his first Nutcracker when he was 11, with London's Royal Ballet. After he moved to the U.S., he danced the Balanchine production with the New York City Ballet.

Update: The three-month strike by Fort Worth Symphony musicians is over. Musicians on Wednesday voted to approve a new contract. The agreement was reached after two days of federal mediation.

Jonas Becker

Mischievous imaginary creatures populate the folklore of Norway, and they loom large in the music of Edvard Grieg, whose home was even named “Troldhaugen (Troll Hill).” From “Peer Gynt,” with its spooky “Mountain King” music, to the “Elves Dance” in Grieg’s “Lyric Pieces,” the composer drew on Norse folklore and folk melodies for his piano tunes, and even the majestic A minor concerto, probably his most famous work.

Ennio Morricone is as about close as a film composer can come to being a household name — and, at age 88, he's still going strong. This year, he was signed to a new record label and has now released a new recording, Morricone 60, named for the number of years he's been in the business.

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