Classical

Texas Public Radio Classical Music blog and other stories.

Alamo City Opera

The Alamo City Opera rolls out a new production this weekend. It's an opera with roots in a short story by one of the towers of American literature. 

"Rappaccini's Daughter is a story by Nathaniel Hawthorne. A haunting, chilling love story. And it's our first opera that's been adapted into Spanish," says director Mark Richter.

They're also taking the opera to an unexpected venue.

Nathan Cone / TPR

A time limit. A saxophone quartet. And a blank sheet of paper. Three young composers recently took advantage of the opportunity to present their creations at the annual Jack Stone Award for New Music Concert, sponsored by the Alamo Colleges District - Northwest Vista College. The diverse sounds were brought to life by the Austin-based Bel Cuore Quartet, who reveled in the opportunity to debut new music to an appreciative audience on Tuesday, March 28.

American musical theater is not all fluff with no bite. In fact, the 1930s saw a maturity coming to the genre. George Gershwin and George Kaufman brought biting satire to the musical stage with "Of Thee I Sing." This, in turn, opened the gates for other socially informed shows, such as Harold Rome's "Pins and Needles," a show produced off and on Broadway by members of The Ladies' Garment Workers' Union.

courtesy Mark Wood

Violinist Mark Wood has the classic music pedigree, but in his upcoming to the Alamo City, don't expect to see him in a tuxedo. 

"My three brothers and I were the first all-brother string quartet, so I grew up on classical music," he says.

Then his parents bought him the Beatles' Sgt. Peppers for Christmas.

"When I heard the Beatles and Led Zeppelin, that changed my entire life," Wood shares.

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