Corpus Christi

From Texas Standard.

Spring break is a time to relax and get away for vacationers, but it’s a make or break season for businesses along the Gulf Coast. And that’s especially so this year, as the region tries to rebound from Hurricane Harvey. So we at the Texas Standard made a few calls. We asked a basic question – how’s business?

From Texas Standard.

After Hurricane Harvey, many Texans realized just how wrong experts were about flood control measures in the state’s most populous city. But Houston isn’t the only Texas city at risk from bad or outdated flood plans.

An investigation by the Corpus Christi Caller Times found that the city’s flood maps are outdated – they’ve gone without revision for three decades. The maps were first drafted for a vastly different Corpus Christi.

David Martin Davies / Texas Public Radio

Christmas Day marks four months since the landfall of Hurricane Harvey. The Category 4 storm struck Rockport on Aug. 25, causing catastrophic destruction.

The high school was one of many buildings severely damaged. And for students, it looked like their annual choral Christmas show would be one more Harvey victim.


Water: A New Export For Corpus Christi?

Nov 20, 2017

From Texas Standard.

When you think about exports and Corpus Christi, fossil fuels typically come to mind. Since Congress lifted the U.S. ban on crude oil exports in 2015, billions of dollars worth of oil has been shipped out of the port there.

Some in Corpus Christi have an idea to diversify the city’s export portfolio with a resource that’s available in abundance around the coastal city. Officials are investigating the viability of large-scale desalination, with a view toward selling water from the Gulf of Mexico to those who need it.

From Texas Standard:

The Permian Basin in West Texas — already the nation's highest-producing oilfield — is seeing a surge in production, and drillers are extracting more crude oil than refiners here can handle. But now, oil companies in the basin have new outlets for that oil, and it's having an economic impact hundreds of miles away.

"This is not a bubble; this is real growth,” Port of Corpus Christi vessel traffic controller Mike Stineman says as he scans real-time navigation charts. Radio chatter between vessels, the Coast Guard and the Vessel Control Center provide a nonstop audio backdrop for Stineman's day-to-day work.

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