Eagle Ford Shale

David Martin Davies

Hydraulic fracturing – or fracking – is the practice of extracting oil trapped in shale rock. It’s producing large quantities of oil in South Texas in the Eagle Ford Shale. That’s one reason why the price of oil has dropped.  But there are questions about the environmental cost of fracking. And one 78-year old nun wants to make sure fracking is done right.

Driving down Texas Highway 72 Sister Elizabeth Riebschlaeger is following a flatbed trailer and calling 9-1-1.

Eileen Pace

 

Energy production in the Eagle Ford Shale has produced a windfall for the Texas economy -- but left behind hazards for residents, school bus drivers, emergency responders, and others who must use the roads. Local officials say they need the legislature’s help to keep up with repairs. We traveled to one of the most active fracking counties to see what Texans there face when they get behind the wheel.

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, has unlocked huge reserves of oil and gas in shale formations in many states. The biggest winner, in terms of new jobs, has been Texas.

But an investigation by Houston Public Media and the Houston Chronicle shows Texas highways have become the nation's deadliest amid a fracking boom.

Eileen Pace

 

The economic impact of the Eagle Ford Shale in South Texas continues to climb each year, and the forecast calls for the trend to continue.

The latest study focuses on sustainability for communities through the oil boom and beyond.

Marked increases in employment rates were seen across South Texas in the last year for counties caught up in the oil boom.  

UTSA’s Dr. Tom Tunstall, who leads the Eagle Ford Shale studies, said each year’s report has shown substantial increases, and projections are strong well into the future.

David Martin Davies / TPR News

At a recent Monday night in Nordheim, a town of 300 about 75 miles southeast of San Antonio, neighbors are gathering at the old dance hall; the Nordheim Shooting Club.

But this isn’t for a night of boot scootin’, they are here to organize against what they see as an environmental threat to their town and their way of life.

Two massive fracking waste disposal pits, one 200 acre site and the other 575 acres, are being proposed for right outside of town.

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