Education

News about education issues in and around San Antonio.

Every year for the past few years, I've dusted off my crystal ball and offered a few predictions for the new year. Back on Nov. 9 though, I threw out the ones I had been working on and started over. The election of Donald Trump altered the landscape for K-12 and higher education and created greater political uncertainty in the debate over how to improve schools. Here's my revised, updated list of predictions for 2017.

The Texas Cultural Trust has a new website that tracks arts education programs at school districts across the state. The map is one way the trust is encouraging parents and students to push for more art education in their local schools. There you can see programs broken down by elementary, middle and high schools in each school district. It looks at how many arts credits were earned by students, the number of art courses offered and the number of students per arts teacher. 

What's The Future Of Cursive Writing?

Dec 12, 2016

The Common Core standards don’t require instruction in cursive writing but some states — including Alabama, Tennessee, Louisiana and California — have mandated cursive in public schools.

With typing often replacing writing in so much of our daily lives, will cursive fade away if it’s not taught in schools — and does it matter?

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Steve Graham, professor at Arizona State University’s Teachers College, about how important handwriting is.

The Texas State Board of Education preliminarily voted 14-0 today to reject a Mexican-American history textbook that scholars have said was riddled with inaccuracies. A final vote on the textbook is due Friday. 

TEA Denies Allegations Of Cap On Special Education

Nov 3, 2016
Bob Daemmrich/Texas Tribune

Editor's note: This story has been updated with additional comment.

The Texas Education Agency told the U.S. Department of Education Wednesday that it has never set a cap or limit on the number or percent of Texas public school students receiving special education support — but added that upcoming changes to the system should help district staff who may have been confused.

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